The Corner

The Safety Word is “Musharraf”

According to the NYT, Pakistan is enabling U.S. domination:

Lacy Threads and Leather Straps Bind a Business

By ADAM B. ELLICK

KARACHI, Pakistan — In Pakistan, a flogger is known only as the Taliban’s choice whip for beating those who defy their strict codes of Islam.

But deep in the nation’s commercial capital, just next door to a mosque and the offices of a radical Islamic organization, in an unmarked house two Pakistani brothers have discovered a more liberal and lucrative use for the scourge: the $3 billion fetish and bondage industry in the West.

Their mom-and-pop-style garment business, AQTH, earns more than $1 million a year manufacturing 2,000 fetish and bondage products, including the Mistress Flogger, and exporting them to the United States and Europe.

You have to love “The Mistress Flogger.” In the U.S. people pay good money to be flogged by their mistress, and in Pakistan you get rounded-up and flogged for being a mistress — and each society can’t begin to endorse or wrap their heads around the other’s practice. And yet, with the birth of Pakistan’s bondage and fetish garment industry targeted at U.S. consumers, some sort of cross-cultural and economic ouroboros is complete. I’m not quite sure what it means yet, but the odds of this turning up as an illuminating punchline in a Steyn column are close to 100 percent, so I’ll just throw down the gauntlet and walk away.

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