The Corner

Spurning a Too-Sterling Sperling

In 1999, former Clinton aide Matt Miller wrote a long profile of Obama’s new chief economic adviser, Gene Sperling, for The New Republic that was spiked for being too positive. TNR ended up running a scaled-down version of the piece, but Miller kept his original draft and has posted it on his website. The TNR editors were right — it is glowingly positive, but it also details a number of the moves Sperling recommended that President Clinton use to counter the GOP congressional leadership on economic issues. House and Senate Republicans should look at the piece for valuable insight into how the White House’s new top economic strategist thinks.

Tevi Troy — Tevi Troy is the President of the American Health Policy Institute. He is also the author of the best-selling book, What Jefferson Read, Ike Watched, and Obama Tweeted: 200 Years ...

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