The Corner

Sullivan Angst

I know I know: Shut up about him already. Two emails deal with the issue:

Mr. Goldberg, Am I the only loyal reader who finds the assorted references to Andrew Sullivan by you and others in The Corner annoying? I stopped reading Sullivan’s own blog two or three years ago when it became painfully obvious that he inhabited some narcissistic planet where overrated Brits go to dazzle with their accents and occasional bon mots. WHO CARES what Sullivan thinks? (Micky Kaus is just as bad about this, by the way.)….

And:

Dear Jonah,

I’m afraid that some time ago…probably mid-2004, I was among those who made it a point to be certain that you knew exactly how uninterested I had become in Andrew Sullivan’s writing. I did that because your commentary made me aware of Sullivan in the first place. I was certainly not angry with you. It was more that I wanted to confirm that you had noticed the same downward trajectory in Sullivan’s logic that I was seeing.

But after your recent comments I have decided I owe you a bit of an apology.

While it is true that I no longer bother with anything Sullivan has to say, I understand that for some odd reason there are still many who take him seriously. So I just wanted you to know that I am grateful to you and Ramesh and Derb for doing a job that many Americans, including this one, absolutely refuse to do…read Andrew Sullivan, take him seriously and rip his silly viewpoint to shreds.

Me: The second reader makes a point a lot of our readers don’t appreciate: For many people out there — particularly among establishment liberals — Sullivan’s interpretation of conservatism is taken deadly seriously. It seems to me that, as painful as it may be for many readers, from time to time it makes sense for the flagship conservative online magazine to point out the various and sundry flaws in the Party of Andrew’s media campaign. Do you think we really enjoy it? Personally, much of this is unpleasant for me. But, it’s our job.

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