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Swiss Approve Use of Suicide Pod

A EU flag flies beside Switzerland’s national flag near the German-Swiss border in Rheinfelden, Germany, March 11, 2019. (Arnd WIegmann/Reuters)

Some time ago, the Australian ghoul and suicide promoter Philip Nitschke, invented a machine for use in making oneself dead. He calls it the “Sarco Suicide Pod,” a futuristic gizmo the suicidal person enters. Once the lid is closed, the despairing person answers a few questions and then pushes a button to be killed by nitrogen overdose in about 30 seconds. Efficient death that supposedly feels good.

Yes, I know it sounds too bizarrely nihilistic to be real — but then, these days there is no such thing as too extreme. And indeed, the Swiss government — which permits for-pay suicide clinics — has now approved the SSP for those who want to die. From the Yahoo News story:

Switzerland has just legalized a new way to die by assisted suicide. The country’s medical review board has just given authorization for use of the Sarco Suicide Pod, which is a 3-D-printed portable coffin-like capsule with windows that can be transported to a tranquil place for a person’s final moments of life.

Conventional assisted-suicide methods have generally involved a chemical substance. Inventor Philip Nitschke of Exit International told the website SwissInfo.ch that his “death pod” offers a different approach. “We want to remove any kind of psychiatric review from the process and allow the individual to control the method themselves,” he said. “Our aim is to develop an artificial-intelligence screening system to establish the person’s mental capacity. Naturally there is a lot of skepticism, especially on the part of psychiatrists.”

The pod can be activated from inside and can give the person intending to die various options for where they want to be for their final moments. “The machine can be towed anywhere for the death,” he said. “It can be in an idyllic outdoor setting or in the premises of an assisted-suicide organization, for example.”

Of course there is no requirement for suicide prevention!

Culture of death, Wesley? What culture of death?

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