The Corner

Religion

Ten Things that Caught My Eye Today (July 5, 2018)

1. Join us for a conversation Ryan Anderson and I will be having with Mona Charen later this month in Washington, D.C.: Sex Matters: How Modern Feminism Lost Touch with Science, Love, and Common Sense

2. In the Washington Post, a window into the unexpected and redemptive ways foster-care can work out when generous hearts are open.

3. Cardinal McCarrick and the Integrity of the Church

4. The Becket Fund has a podcast with human faces of their religious-liberty cases. Latest episode is with Sr. Constance Veit from the Little Sisters of the Poor.

Also, Sister Constance on religious freedom and “Serving Others in God’s Love.”

5. Robert P. George on Amy Barrett as “The Diversity Nominee”First Things

The overriding consideration, however, is that our justices be faithful constitutionalists—and by that I mean, jurists whose decisions are guided by the text, logic, structure, and original public meaning of the Constitution. These are people who do not pretend that things that are not in the Constitution are there (lurking, perhaps, in “penumbras formed by emanations” or in the due process clauses of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments interpreted “substantively”), or that things that actually are in the Constitution are not there.
Due in no small measure to thirty years of remarkable work in legal education by the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy, presidents today who are looking for true constitutionalists to nominate for appointments to the federal judiciary at every level, including the Supreme Court, have an outstanding pool of possible nominees. From this pool, President Trump selected Neil Gorsuch—a jurist of high intellect, exceptional learning, impeccable integrity, and admirable temperament. The question now: Who should be next?

Of course, it might be that, in fact, prejudice against Catholics and other traditional religious believers is not the last acceptable prejudice. There is one more: prejudice against large families, and especially against women who have large families. (Do you doubt me? Just ask any mother of five or more children about the abusive comments to which she is subjected, sometimes by complete strangers,
when out in public with the kids.) Amy Coney Barrett is the mother of seven children—one is a special needs child, and two are adopted (from Haiti). Defying that prejudice while giving the country a top-class Supreme Court justice drawn from a superb pool would be another merit of the president’s choosing Judge Barrett.

6. On Amy Barrett, I’m grateful for this Ruth Graham piece at Slate.

And for this Chris Hayes tweet:

And, of course, Mona’s.

Amy Coney Barrett’s ‘Cult’

“Judge Amy Barrett Speaks About The Difficult Role Of A SCOTUS Justice” (Hat tip Mark Levin.)

7. At the Mirror of Justice blog: Roe will probably be reversed even further than before; the real combat is over Casey.

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(& do follow if you’re on Twitter.)

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