The Corner

Culture

Thursday Links

Whatever is dreamed on this night, will come to pass; the summer solstice is June 21 at 6:07 a.m. Eastern Time. Related, Fridgehenge: To celebrate the solstice, British guy recreated Stonehenge using old refrigerators.

Gallery: Cars with Propellers.

During the Great Depression, “Penny Restaurants” Fed the Unemployed.

How to Have a Healthy Summer: Advice from 1656: You’ll need to drink feebl green Wine and eschue the company of women.

Operation Acoustic Kitty: (Unsuccessful) Cold War attempt to eavesdrop via transmitters implanted into cats:

CIA staffers drove Acoustic Kitty to the park and tasked it with capturing the conversation of two men sitting on a bench. Instead, the cat wandered into the street, where it was promptly squashed by a taxi.

Alcohol — is there anything it can’t do? Drunk People Are Better at Creative Problem Solving.

ICYMI, Monday’s links are here, and include the anniversary of the 1815 Battle of Waterloo (including, of course, a Lego re-enactment), the sport of motor-ball (a.k.a. soccer on motorcycles), prayers to stop a dog from barking, and where to hit someone (aside from their wallet) to do the most damage.

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Law & the Courts

It’s a Set-up

In my column yesterday, I contended that the unverifiable sexual-assault allegation against Judge Brett Kavanaugh bore “all the hallmarks of a set-up.” I based that assessment on the patently flimsy evidence, coupled with Senate Democrats’ duplicitous abuse of the confirmation-hearing process. To repeat ... Read More
Law & the Courts

Censure Dianne Feinstein

Regardless of the fate of Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination, the Senate should censure the ranking Democratic member of the Judiciary Committee, Dianne Feinstein. Her deception and maneuvering, condemned across the political spectrum, seriously interfered with the Senate’s performance of its constitutional duty to ... Read More
U.S.

Are We on the Verge of Civil War?

Americans keep dividing into two hostile camps. It seems the country is back to 1860 on the eve of the Civil War, rather than in 2018, during the greatest age of affluence, leisure, and freedom in the history of civilization. The ancient historian Thucydides called the civil discord that tore apart the ... Read More