The Corner

Today’s Questions for the President

David Ignatius of the Washington Post reports that while you were leading (from behind) the effort to depose Libya’s Moammar Qaddafi, former CIA officers were warning last September that terrorist groups were attempting to acquire some of the estimated 20,000 shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles in the Libyan military arsenal.

Immediately after Qaddafi was overthrown, scores of al-Qaeda flags were raised throughout Libyan cities, including over the rebel headquarters in Benghazi. Rebel leader Abdel Hakim al-Hasidi admitted that a significant number of the rebels consisted of al-Qaeda fighters, many of whom had fought U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

In November, a U.N. envoy reported that after Qaddafi was deposed, Libyan weapons depots were left unguarded. The depots contained, among other things, chemical and nuclear material, including 7,000 barrels of uranium.

Assistant Secretary of State Andrew Shapiro stated that terrorist groups were interested in obtaining the Libyan anti-aircraft missiles, which “could pose a threat to civil aviation.” Ignatius reports that the former CIA officers explained that the missiles include Russian made SA-7s and SA-24s. Only 5,000 of the  Libyan missiles  have been secured under a buy-back program, and the former CIA officers state that  missiles are in the hands of al-Qaeda and Boko Haram, an affiliated terrorist organization.

How many missiles have actually been accounted for? How many remain missing? Why weren’t the weapons depots secured? Was it because we were leading from behind?

Given the evident al-Qaeda sympathies of many of the rebels, what precautions did you take to ensure that Libyan chemical, radiological, and conventional weapons would not end up in the hands of terrorists?

Why aren’t shoulder- fired missiles as alarming a threat as underwear bombers?

What is the status of the estimated 7,000 barrels of uranium?

What is the status of our present relationship with Libya?

Peter Kirsanow — Peter N. Kirsanow is an attorney and a member of the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

Most Popular

Elections

An Election Too Important to Be Left to Voters

The Democrats believe that the 2020 election is too important to be left to the voters. It’s obvious that President Donald Trump withheld defense aid to Ukraine to pressure its president to commit to the investigations that he wanted, an improper use of his power that should rightly be the focus of ... Read More
Elections

An Election Too Important to Be Left to Voters

The Democrats believe that the 2020 election is too important to be left to the voters. It’s obvious that President Donald Trump withheld defense aid to Ukraine to pressure its president to commit to the investigations that he wanted, an improper use of his power that should rightly be the focus of ... Read More
Film & TV

A Feeble Fox News Attack at the Movies

Don’t hold your breath waiting for Oscar-winning talents to rip the lid off the scandal at NBC News, whose bosses still have suffered no repercussions for their part in the Harvey Weinstein matter and other sleazy deeds — but at least Hollywood has finally let us know how they feel about Fox News ... Read More
Film & TV

A Feeble Fox News Attack at the Movies

Don’t hold your breath waiting for Oscar-winning talents to rip the lid off the scandal at NBC News, whose bosses still have suffered no repercussions for their part in the Harvey Weinstein matter and other sleazy deeds — but at least Hollywood has finally let us know how they feel about Fox News ... Read More
Elections

More Bad News for Medicare for All

The hits keep coming for Medicare for All. Gallup’s annual health-care survey of adults found that Americans back a system based on private insurance rather than government provision by 54 percent to 42 percent. “This could create a challenge in a general election campaign for a Democratic presidential ... Read More
Elections

More Bad News for Medicare for All

The hits keep coming for Medicare for All. Gallup’s annual health-care survey of adults found that Americans back a system based on private insurance rather than government provision by 54 percent to 42 percent. “This could create a challenge in a general election campaign for a Democratic presidential ... Read More
Elections

It’s Not Because She’s a Woman

In early October, Elizabeth Warren hit her stride. Her stock in the Democratic primary had been climbing steadily since midsummer, and as Joe Biden continued to lag, the Massachusetts senator became the first presidential hopeful to overtake him as front-runner in the RealClearPolitics polling average. She’s ... Read More
Elections

It’s Not Because She’s a Woman

In early October, Elizabeth Warren hit her stride. Her stock in the Democratic primary had been climbing steadily since midsummer, and as Joe Biden continued to lag, the Massachusetts senator became the first presidential hopeful to overtake him as front-runner in the RealClearPolitics polling average. She’s ... Read More