The Corner

Politics & Policy

Trump: I ‘Always Felt That I Was in the Military’ Because of Boarding School

Yes, yes, comments section, NRO is full of Trump Derangement Syndrome, we’re all GOP Establishment wimps, we’re all in the tank for Jeb, yadda yadda yadda…

Because only a Georgetown salon-attending squish could possibly object to a candidate claiming that a military-themed boarding school is the equivalent of serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.

You have to be a frothing-at-the-mouth Trump-hater to find the statement that boarding school attendees have “more training militarily than a lot of the guys that go into the military” is unhinged, and suggests an unnerving detachment from reality for a potential commander-in-chief.

Trump: I ‘Always Felt That I Was in the Military’ Because of Boarding School

This won’t bother Trump supporters. Nothing does.

Donald Trump, who received draft deferments through much of the Vietnam War, told the author of a forthcoming biography that he nevertheless “always felt that I was in the military” because of his education at a military-themed boarding school.

Mr. Trump said that his experience at the New York Military Academy, an expensive prep school where his parents had sent him to correct poor behavior, gave him “more training militarily than a lot of the guys that go into the military.” …

According to the book, Mr. Trump attended the New York Military Academy after years of rowdy and rebellious behavior at Kew-Forest, a more traditional prep school in Queens. Mr. Trump once recalled giving a teacher at Kew-Forest a black eye “because I didn’t think he knew anything about music.”

He arrived at the military academy — where tuition now reaches $31,000 a year — for eighth grade in 1959 and remained for high school. Like all students at the Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y., campus, he wore a uniform, participated in marching drills and was expected to conform to a hierarchy imposed by instructors, some of whom had served in the military.

The book also quotes Trump as saying, “For the most part, you can’t respect people because most people aren’t worthy of respect.”

Gee, that philosophy couldn’t be possibly be dangerous or a bad idea in a commander-in-chief, right? When you look back at the great presidents in American history, whichever ones you like – George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, FDR, Truman, Ike, Ronald Reagan – what comes shining through is that fundamental belief that most people aren’t worthy of respect, right?

Most Popular

PC Culture

Hate-Crime Hoaxes Reflect America’s Sickness

On January 29, tabloid news site TMZ broke the shocking story that Jussie Smollett, a gay black entertainer and progressive activist, had been viciously attacked in Chicago. Two racist white men had fractured his rib, poured bleach on him, and tied a noose around his neck. As they were leaving, they shouted ... Read More
Elections

One Last Grift for Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders, the antique Brooklyn socialist who represents Vermont in the Senate, is not quite ready to retire to his lakeside dacha and so once again is running for the presidential nomination of a party to which he does not belong with an agenda about which he cannot be quite entirely ... Read More
Politics & Policy

The Strange Paradoxes of Our Age

Modern prophets often say one thing and do another. Worse, they often advocate in the abstract as a way of justifying their doing the opposite in the concrete. The result is that contemporary culture abounds with the inexplicable — mostly because modern progressivism makes all sorts of race, class, and ... Read More
U.S.

White Progressives Are Polarizing America

To understand how far left (and how quickly) the Democratic party has moved, let’s cycle back a very short 20 years. If 1998 Bill Clinton ran in the Democratic primary today, he’d be instantaneously labeled a far-right bigot. His support for the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, the Defense of Marriage Act, ... Read More
Film & TV

A Sublime Christian Masterpiece of a Film

‘There are two ways through life -- the way of nature and the way of grace,” remarks the saintly mother at the outset of The Tree of Life, one of the most awe-inspiring films of the 21st century. She continues: Grace doesn’t try please itself. It accepts being slighted, forgotten, disliked, accepts insults ... Read More