The Corner

Culture

Twelve Things That Caught My Eye Today (September 20, 2019)

1. Indiana bishop offers cemetery for burial of aborted remains

2. One of the reasons I started focusing more on foster care and adoption is because they often only come up in the news when there something abhorrent happens or when there is a political clash (usually involving same-sex marriage, now transgender issues, too). More educational and reform efforts are needed. But, oh my goodness, what this child suffered

Naomi Schaefer Riley’s report published last week really does need to make the statehouse rounds.

3. “Ulrich Klopfer’s treatment of aborted babies is horrifying, but not shocking

4. During Brexit storm, U.K.’s efforts to protect religious freedom fly under the radar

5. Salena Zito: Repurposing ‘America’s Hometown’

6. Our John J. Miller with the Houses of Worship column in the Wall Street Journal today: “When a Mob Descended on Mass

7. Peggy Noonan on the left and Brett Kavanaugh (also, WSJ, of course)

8. Matt Continetti: “Kavanaugh and the Crisis of Legitimacy

9. A call to close Riker’s Island in New York

10. Who invented religious freedom?

11. This sounds like a needed event in NY: Old Age as a Time of Grace? A discussion about caring for the elderly in the 21st Century

12. The new book A Year with the Mystics is 10 percent off at Amazon

PLUS:

I’ll be talking about A Year with the Mystics in D.C. on Tuesday night. Details here.

If you’re in New York, join me for a conversation about the virtue of hope with Pete Wehner, Michael Wear, and Kristen Hanson.

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