The Corner

Culture

Viva l’Italia?

Italy has just had elections, with very interesting results. I wanted to talk with Alberto Mingardi, which I have. He is one of the leading classical liberals in Italy — the director general of the Bruno Leoni Institute, in Milan. (Mingardi himself is Milanese.) He is also an authority in arts and letters.

In our Q&A, we do indeed talk the elections, and politics. But we also branch out — into demography, which is related to politics, true. Have Italians stopped having babies and families? No more cugini, nipoti, zii, and so on? Will immigration make up for this? What will this do to Italy?

We further branch into books, music, and, crucially, food. You can understand Italy through its food, says Mingardi. Italy is a federalist and pluralistic place. What the Lombards eat will be a lot different from what the Calabrians eat.

Anyway, a nice little discussion, all’italiana. Alberto Mingardi is worth listening to, on any number of subjects.

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