The Corner

The Wages of Sin

. . . is you know what, as the Good Book says. And the wages of Marxism-Leninism, ditto:

This week Russian president Vladimir Putin brought Boyz II Men to Moscow to “hopefully [give] Russian men some inspiration ahead of St. Valentine’s Day,” according to the Moscow Times. That is, Putin brought the music group to town to encourage love-making, and, he hopes, baby-making to offset Russia’s demographic disaster. 

But, according to statistics in a new book by Jonathan V. Last, it might have been a wiser move for Putin bring in a pro-life group instead. The book is titled What to Expect When No One’s Expecting.

Russia’s demographic disaster, Last details, is being exasperated [sic] by the fact that abortions are outpacing live births in Russia. “Abortion is rampant, with 13 abortions performed for every 10 live births,” writes Last. “Consider that for a moment: Russians are so despondent about the future that they have 30 percent more abortions than births.”

As someone who spent much of the years between 1985 and 1991 behind the Iron Curtain and in the belly of the beast, let me just say that this comes as no shock. I recall in Moscow once a Russian-speaking American woman telling me that if you wanted to see the effects of abortion on Soviet women, you needed only to visit the women’s banyas to witness first hand what Soviet medicine was capable of — abdomens with multiple, horrific scars, the result of the Soviets’ preferred method of birth control: abortion. (But hey — at least it was free!)

Back then, one expected an officially atheistic society such as the USSR to employ such murderous tactics against its future citizenry: What bother killing them tomorrow when you can kill them today? That we’ve elevated such an ethos to a constitutional right in our country is a national moral disgrace. But that’s what comes of letting leftism infiltrate and undermine previously accepted societal norms in the name of “progress” and “revenge.”

The Suicide Cult that is the radical American Left continues apace. Long past time to ask ourselves: What would Dagger John do — and act accordingly.

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