The Corner

Walker’s Darling

The latest from Wisconsin:

Mequon, Wis.

As Alberta Darling takes a chair at the Wooden Goose Café, Neil Young’s “Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black)” softly plays on the kitchen stereo. The pony-tailed waitress, pen in hand, stands ready to take our order. But before Darling puts a napkin on her lap, an elderly man with ancient hands approaches, places a palm on her shoulder, and says, “You’re the strongest woman I know.” She thanks him. A second later, she scans the room and spies numerous retirees, early risers breaking their fast on over-easy eggs and black coffee. So she gets up and makes the rounds, moving from table to table in a bright blue T-shirt emblazoned with her name and Old Glory. Several minutes later, we settle back in. “It’s all about the ground game,” she says.

Unlike most of the patrons, Darling, a 67-year-old Republican state senator, will not be hitting the links or relaxing with a paperback after breakfast. Instead, she will be knocking on doors, striding purposefully up long driveways in this suburban Milwaukee district, with crisp, star-spangled pamphlets under her arm. Darling has been in close races before, but Tuesday’s recall elections in the Badger State are different from the usual political scrums. Labor activists have targeted her and five GOP colleagues, enraged at the senators’ support of first-term Republican governor Scott Walker, who famously curbed state spending and collective bargaining for public employees earlier this year. If Democrats can win three of the six contests, they will take control of the upper chamber, which currently has a 19–14 Republican majority.

More here.

Robert Costa — Robert Costa is National Review's Washington editor and a CNBC political analyst. He manages NR's Capitol Hill bureau and covers the White House, Congress, and national campaigns. ...

Most Popular

Why Not Make Democrats Angry?

Some of the Right’s leading thinkers, people I hold in the highest esteem, say circumstances are so unusual right now that the president and the Senate should do something other than what they ordinarily would do when a Supreme Court vacancy occurs: nominate and consider a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader ... Read More

Why Not Make Democrats Angry?

Some of the Right’s leading thinkers, people I hold in the highest esteem, say circumstances are so unusual right now that the president and the Senate should do something other than what they ordinarily would do when a Supreme Court vacancy occurs: nominate and consider a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader ... Read More
U.S.

Systemic Racism? Make Them Prove It.

I  worked in the criminal-justice system for a quarter century. It is run, day-to-day, by the crème de la crème of graduates from America’s top law schools. Those institutions wear their progressive bona fides on their sleeves and proclaim it for all the world to hear. In their offhand rhetoric — ... Read More
U.S.

Systemic Racism? Make Them Prove It.

I  worked in the criminal-justice system for a quarter century. It is run, day-to-day, by the crème de la crème of graduates from America’s top law schools. Those institutions wear their progressive bona fides on their sleeves and proclaim it for all the world to hear. In their offhand rhetoric — ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Get Your Facts Right

On the menu today: Another reminder that “People of Praise” and “People of Hope” are not the same group, and proof that “People of Hope” did not inspire Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale; wondering what Joe Biden is doing with his time these days; and two Senate committees release their ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Get Your Facts Right

On the menu today: Another reminder that “People of Praise” and “People of Hope” are not the same group, and proof that “People of Hope” did not inspire Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale; wondering what Joe Biden is doing with his time these days; and two Senate committees release their ... Read More