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What About the Kids Who Are Not Alright? How Can More of Us Help?

Never was there a better time for those who have ever considered being foster parents to make a move toward more seriously praying about it. That’s one major takeaway from my latest quarantine-time conversation. I talk with Nathan Bult and Cheri Williams of Bethany Christian Services. Both have extensive experience in child protection and public policy. Both are Easter people who talk a bit about the clear Christian obligations to care for the orphaned, to make sure no children are left orphans, as God does not leave us orphans. I think that you may find this a helpful conversation, especially if you have had people more vulnerable than yourself on your heart — most especially vulnerable children. Among other points that come up during the conversation: In some places where Bethany is active, referrals to foster care are down — suggesting a surge to come. Those who would normally see the signs of a child in a crisis situation don’t have access to children to see. Another point: Because training for foster care now has to happen remotely, it may be much more convenient for a couple that, say, normally would have to find child care or juggle schedules.

I hope that this conversation, like all the virus-free forum conversations the National Review Institute has been making available, helps as you discern what more you are being called to do in your community during this time, as people become more vulnerable to evils and our reliance on one another becomes clearer.

And as with all of the forums — in person or virtually — that we have on foster care and adoption, we also discuss the fact that not everyone is called to be foster or adoptive parents, but we all have our roles.

As with most programming from NRI’s Center for Religion, Culture, and Civil Society, I pray it helps make practical some of the ways we are more powerful than we realize — and especially at a time like this.

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