The Corner

Culture

What Is the Point of the ‘Women’s March’?

Protesters form triangles with their hands during a demonstration for women’s rights on International Women’s Day in Bilbao, Spain, March 8, 2018. (Vincent West/Reuters)

What is the point of the ‘Women’s March’? Really. In 2017, hundreds of thousands gathered the day after Trump’s inauguration, for a purpose: to protest the man who had beaten the woman they preferred in the 2016 presidential race. They were “resisting” misogyny. But three years later, the movement has lost energy and focus. On its website, the mission statement reads:

Women’s March is a women-led movement providing intersectional education on a diverse range of issues and creating entry points for new grassroots activists & organizers to engage in their local communities through trainings, outreach programs and events. Women’s March is committed to dismantling systems of oppression through nonviolent resistance and building inclusive structures guided by self-determination, dignity and respect.

“Intersectional education.” “Diverse range of issues.” “Inclusive structures.” What does any of this mean?

Judging from this year’s marchers’ signs, “dismantling systems of oppression” refers primarily to Trump’s policies in relation to climate change, immigration, and abortion access. And also, to fighting transphobia, racism, homophobia, and various other social ills. Whatever the point of it is supposed to be, former supporters are disengaged. NPR reported that there was “just a fraction of the original turnout [as in previous years] as the movement struggled with changes in leadership and questions about inclusivity.” NPR attempted to put a positive spin on this, offering the headline, “Women’s March Draws a Smaller, But Passionate Crowd.”

In reality, the only thing that the Women’s March is marching towards is irrelevance.

Madeleine Kearns is a William F. Buckley Fellow in Political Journalism at the National Review Institute. She is from Glasgow, Scotland, and is a trained singer.

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