The Corner

NR Webathon

When the Chips Are Down, You’re Chipping In

National Review founder William F. Buckley Jr. in the magazine’s early years

The task of keeping this vital conservative institution operating at full capacity and punching well above its weight (and are we ever!) has been a challenging undertaking, but some 62 years after Bill Buckley and Bill Rusher discovered the pressing truth — that National Review’s readers are very much more than subscribers, that they are indeed partners in the business and the cause of defying and battling the Establishment Left — we find out yet again how much this band of brothers and sisters persists, especially in grim times.

Our ongoing short-term effort to raise $100,000 (or more if possible, let us pray) to underwrite the just-this-side-of-crushing costs that are a mainstay of “opinion” journalism has found favor so far with approaching 350 readers and friends, dear friends indeed, who have seen fit to donate from $3 to $1,000. We approach $30,000 in donations, and hope to surpass that before the day ends. This is all terribly heartening. It would be so in the best of times. It is very much more so in these times of crisis and uncertainty.

With the kindness of the donations often comes words of inspiration and encouragement, which we are happy to share, in part in the hopes that such might inspire others to enlarge the ranks of we few, we happy few:

  • Big Bad Jacob sends along $100 and truer words never spoken: “Having a trusted source for calm, reasoned commentary is invaluable in this age of chyron dominated journalism. Keep up the great work!” This great work shares pride of ownership with you Jacob. Thanks.
  • Teresa, making a $50 contribution, finds us a competitor for orange juice and cereal: “NRO is the first thing I read every morning. I like the different views and many of the writers — especially Andrew McCarthy (I am an attorney and love his well-written legal explanations) and Kevin W., Jay, Jim G., and K-Lo. Keep up the good work! P.S. I have my two college-student daughters, avidly reading NR and NRO!” T, you made our day (and I have a son in college who . . .)
  • Another General Grant arrives, this time from Kathleen, who enjoys the entire enchilada that is NRO: “Thank you for your comprehensive, timely coverage. I particularly enjoy David Harsanyi, a writer whose work I enjoyed when he was with The Federalist. I also appreciate that you are still covering other issues of import.” Not as much as we appreciate your generosity.
  • Another fifty smackers from Garrett, who turns on the firehose of praise: “I appreciate the research, the analysis, the attribution of your sources, the wit, the style, the honesty to admit when you were wrong, your consistency in standing up for fairness even if it means defending those with whom you disagree.” Thanks G-Man . . . we are all about the Truth.
  • Eric spots us a C-Note and then this: “God bless you all. I get an immeasurable amount of joy from what you do. Keep up the good work.” That you feel this way, it so floats the boat. Thanks Eric.
  • Josephine finds $50 to send our way and makes us blush: “The rigorous and thoughtful analyses by the NR writers of so many aspects of this crisis is remarkable and not to be found anywhere else. I hope you all keep safe and well and continue your much needed work.” Back at you and double!
  • And then there is Virginia. Sweet, sweet Virginia, who also tenders a Fifty, sending it with wit and love the kind we can never get used to: “I’ve been reading National Review since I was in high school (I’m now 72 — ouch — that’s hard to write) and I would gladly give my last dollar, if need be to keep NR alive. A finer magazine there has never been. Thanks to all at NR – you’re the best!” Wow. Such kindness. And by the way, you look like you’re 42! Much love Virginia.

Might you be inspired to follow suit, in some way? Times are tough, but that is when NR’s sanity, its dedication to truth, its unrivaled analysis and commentary (our coverage of the coronavirus threat has been absolutely transcendent and exceptional), is most needed. If you can find your way to a contribution, may I suggest $25, $40, or $100? If more is possible — $100, $500, or even a contribution with four or more numbers (not including the ones after the decimal point!) — do consider that. Consider what we know: That whatever this thing is that is NR, it includes our supporters. Bill Buckley believed, rightly, that he owned NR in stewardship for the kind souls who kept us in supply of ammo. No amount is trivial, all goes towards us reaching (we pray) or even surpassing (we really pray) our $100,000 goal (and for those keeping score, we have April 12 as our deadline). Have you have already helped? If so, copious thanks. If you have not, please do give here. If you prefer to send a check, make it payable to “National Review” addressed to National Review, ATTN: 2020 Webathon, 19 West 44th Street, Suite 1701, New York, NY 10036. Also please consider this, if you might be in the mood to make a truly significant contribution: Do email me at jfowler@nationalreview.com to discuss some convenient means. God’s blessings and graces on one and all, and let’s pray we not only beat but crush this malady so afflicting our nation and world.

Most Popular

Science & Tech

About That Scary Hydroxychloroquine Study

Remember that scary hydroxychloroquine study in The Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine that everyone in the media was writing about a few weeks ago? It turns out that the underlying data were likely fake: A Guardian investigation can reveal the US-based company Surgisphere, whose handful of employees ... Read More
Science & Tech

About That Scary Hydroxychloroquine Study

Remember that scary hydroxychloroquine study in The Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine that everyone in the media was writing about a few weeks ago? It turns out that the underlying data were likely fake: A Guardian investigation can reveal the US-based company Surgisphere, whose handful of employees ... Read More

Biden as Paradox

It is now conventional punditry that should Joe Biden win in November, his vice president, in 1944-style, will sooner rather than later become president. Biden, to reboot and secure the identity-politics base, thought he had to discriminate by sex and race in advance by selecting his vice president. But given ... Read More

Biden as Paradox

It is now conventional punditry that should Joe Biden win in November, his vice president, in 1944-style, will sooner rather than later become president. Biden, to reboot and secure the identity-politics base, thought he had to discriminate by sex and race in advance by selecting his vice president. But given ... Read More
U.S.

What Happened to Social Distancing?

Cardenas Ortiz-Sandoval’s mother, Guadalupe, died last month. Cardenas, 22, helped to plan her funeral. She was told by mortuary officials that the state of California would not allow more than ten people to attend her mother’s graveside service. Some family members were forced to stay home. Lifelong friends ... Read More
U.S.

What Happened to Social Distancing?

Cardenas Ortiz-Sandoval’s mother, Guadalupe, died last month. Cardenas, 22, helped to plan her funeral. She was told by mortuary officials that the state of California would not allow more than ten people to attend her mother’s graveside service. Some family members were forced to stay home. Lifelong friends ... Read More
U.S.

The Lockdowns Are Now a Scandal

A boy in my neighborhood committed suicide a few weeks ago. It’s possible that the teen’s preexisting problems were exacerbated by the seclusion, tediousness, and helplessness of a national lockdown. Maybe not. I didn’t really know him. I do know that locals were forced to pay respects by sitting parked ... Read More
U.S.

The Lockdowns Are Now a Scandal

A boy in my neighborhood committed suicide a few weeks ago. It’s possible that the teen’s preexisting problems were exacerbated by the seclusion, tediousness, and helplessness of a national lockdown. Maybe not. I didn’t really know him. I do know that locals were forced to pay respects by sitting parked ... Read More