The Corner

Why Work?

Why, indeed? Over at Zero Hedge, Tyler Durden has an interesting answer:

Emmerich analyzes disposable income and economic benefits among several key income classes and comes to the stunning (and verifiable) conclusion that “a one-parent family of three making $14,500 a year (minimum wage) has more disposable income than a family making $60,000 a year.” And that excludes benefits from Supplemental Security Income disability checks. America is now a country which punishes those middle-class people who not only try to work hard, but avoid scamming the system.

More data here:

Maybe President Obama and Mr. Krugman should direct some of their attention to this problem rather than spending so much of their time complaining that the rich don’t get soaked enough.

Veronique de Rugy is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.

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