The Corner

Religion

You Want to Know the Sisters of Life and Be a Part of Their Lives — They Want to Be a Part of Yours

If the NYPD are New York’s finest, the Sisters of Life are New York’s greatest and joyous, and they are these things in the face of grave evil, too. They were founded after an inspiration the late New York archbishop Cardinal John O’Connor had at Dachau. He founded this community of women religious to help pregnant women in need and so much more. The Sisters of Life now number about 100 and are in Philadelphia, Connecticut, D.C., Toronto, and Denver. I often think of them as our pro-life credibility. Who is going to walk with women? Who is going to grieve with women who have had abortions? Who is praying for an end to abortion? Who shows hope? They do, and many other things. And they also have a network of co-workers who step up to the plate in ways big and small.

In the latest conversation in the “virus-free” National Review Institute series hosted here with leaders in faith and culture and civil society, I talk with Sr. Magdalene Teresa and Sr. Mariae Agnus Dei from the Sisters of Life about their life and ministry. And we do so in advance of the Sisters of Life first ever virtual gala on Thursday night, which we are all invited to for free. It’s their hope to inspire more people to get involved in their network of love.

Listen to our conversation that includes honest sharing about life in these times:

And sign up for their virtual gala here.

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