Exchequer

Elections

The OPEC Bailout Is Not Happening

Good news for Generic Republican, who already has established himself as a legitimate contender for the White House in 2012: OPEC is not bailing us out. The oil cartel is making it known that it is cool with $100 oil and will not act unless prices move significantly higher and stay there. Oil, like most commodities, has been rising steadily as governments around the world keep their printing presses running to dump new money into the global economy.

Oil producers have a real good to sell, one with intrinsic value. They do not want to be paid in devalued currencies. Neither do producers selling precious metals, fertilizer, farm products, etc., which is one reason why wholesale food prices are going zoom, zoom, zoom.

Oil at $100 and unemployment ~10 percent is bad news for Obama’s re-election hopes, of course. (It should go without saying that it is bad for America, too, and that I do not wish for economic suffering to be visited upon my fellow citizens in order to hamper the Obama administration.)  But you know what’s even worse than $100 oil? $150 oil, which the CEO of Gulf says would not surprise him. There will be tremendous political pressure put on OPEC and the other producers if that happens. But why would OPEC want to bail us out? What is in it for them? Devalued U.S. dollars? If the Obama administration will not get behind a solid dollar for sound economic reasons, maybe narrow political self-interest will be enough.

We spend a lot of time thinking about our competition with China in producing goods and services; but it is equally important, probably more important, that we compete with the Chinese and the other rising economies as consumers of goods and services. The United States is still the big boss in terms of global energy demand, but small, steady changes elsewhere are making it a new game. The energy autarkists who like to rave about the evils of “Arab oil” (never mind that the biggest part of our oil imports are Canadian and Mexican) fail to appreciate that with every passing month it matters a little bit less to the Arab world whether we buy their oil or don’t. Clout has a shelf life, and money talks. What is our money saying, vis-à-vis oil, food, metals, etc.? I think it’s saying “Help me!” in that tiny, terrifying little voice at the end of the original The Fly.

Back to Obama: I’m starting to think that we despairing deficit hawks have to be more politically engaged. I’ve operated for the past several years under the theory that when it comes to the big, macro debt-and-deficit issues, it does not much matter who holds political power: I did not see much evidence that a Republican Congress or a Democratic Congress was going to act before the market acts, forcing fiscal discipline on the United States by jacking up borrowing costs. Yes, there are differences, but the differences between the parties is very small compared with the difference between either of the parties and what reality requires.

But I am starting to reconsider that. The Republican party still is not serious about the fiscal issues, but there is an element within the party that is, and it needs to be encouraged and empowered. Somebody has a chance to own this issue. Who will?

—  Kevin D. Williamson is a deputy managing editor of National Review and author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Socialism, just published by Regnery. You can buy an autographed copy through National Review Online here.

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