Human Exceptionalism

Canadian Bar Association Wants More Euthanasia

Once a society accepts the premise that killing is an acceptable answer to suffering, there is seemingly no upper limit to which that principle will eventually not apply.

The Canadian Supreme Court recently imposed a nationwide right to euthanasia. The government passed a bill with an extremely loose–nay, close to meaningless–restriction that death be “foreseeable” to qualify for the lethal jab.

But that small impediment is too much for culture of death aficionados. Now, the Canadian Bar Association wants more euthanasia. From the Canadian Press story:

The Canadian Bar Association is urging the federal government to expand its restrictive new law on assisted dying, allowing mature minors, people suffering strictly from psychological illnesses and those diagnosed with competence-eroding conditions like dementia to get medical help to end their suffering.

Two brief points:

1. The Canadian Supreme Court ruling made a point of finding that the right to be killed to end suffering is not limited to the terminally ill. The two criteria are a medially diagnosed condition and irremediable suffering–as defined by the patient. Hence, the “forseeeable” limitation probably is not constitutional.

2. The ruling did require competency, both medical and legal. But I have little doubt that having radically changed medical ethics and law based on their own opinions, the justices won’t expand their ruling to include “mature” minors and pre-authorization for euthanasia in the event one becomes incapacitated.

As I always say: The culture of death is like the universe. It never stops expanding. 

 

Most Popular

Politics & Policy

Making Sense of the Iran Chaos

One would prefer that correct decisions be made according to careful, deliberate plan. But a correct decision made impulsively, through a troubling process, is still nonetheless correct, and so it is with Donald Trump’s decision to refrain from military action against Iran. The proposed strike would represent a ... Read More
Film & TV

Murder Mystery: An Old Comedy Genre Gets Polished Up

I  like Adam Sandler, and yet you may share the sense of trepidation I get when I see that another of his movies is out. He made some very funny manboy comedies (Billy Madison, Happy Gilmore, The Waterboy) followed by some not-so-funny manboy comedies, and when he went dark, in Reign over Me and Funny People, ... Read More
Politics & Policy

New Deal . . . Conservatives?

I am second to none in my admiration for William F. Buckley Jr., but on matters of electoral politics his judgment was not exactly infallible. For example, he floated the idea of having former president Dwight Eisenhower join Barry Goldwater’s ticket as the vice-presidential nominee, which was possibly ... Read More