Human Exceptionalism

Euthanasia of the Blind in the Netherlands!

It gets worse and worse–and yet the stories still repeat the mantra that euthanasia is implemented under “strict guidelines.”  

A Netherlanders woman lost her vision and was killed on request by her doctor. From the Dutch News NL story:

A 70-year-old woman who went blind was helped to die by euthanasia, Trouw reported at the weekend. It is the first time someone was found to be ’suffering unbearably’ purely because of blindness, the paper said. The assisted suicide was found to be in line with government rules by health inspectors, the paper said.

Of course it was!

Then comes the mandatory “strict guidelines” canard:

Euthanasia is legal in the Netherlands under strict conditions. For example, the patient must be suffering unbearable pain and the doctor must be convinced the patient is making an informed choice

Strict conditions?! Mentally ill people are euthanized. Disabled people are euthanized. Infants are killed in their cribs based on an “unlivable life.” Etc. beyond etc.

And indeed, the woman was also apparently mentally ill:

Trouw said the woman was born with poor eyesight but had gradually become blind. She had tried to kill herself several times and lived alone since her husband died. Specialist Lia Bruin told the paper the woman’s case was exceptional. ‘She was, for example, obsessed by cleanliness and could not stand being unable to see spots on her clothes,’ Bruin is quoted as saying.

Repeat after me: The guidelines aren’t there to actually protect the vulnerable. They exist to give the false appearance of control.

Most Popular

Politics & Policy

FBI Lovebirds Is D.C. Satire at Its Best

What do you get when you take Dean Cain, an actor famous for playing Superman on TV, and Kristy Swanson, the actress who was the original Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and give them the chance to play a couple of adulterous, wildly partisan FBI agents working at the highest levels of the Mueller Russiagate ... Read More
Film & TV

In Toy Story 4, the Franchise Shows Its Age

For a film franchise, 24 years is middle-aged, bordering on elderly. Nearly a quarter-century after the first Toy Story, the fourth installment, which hits theaters later this week, feels a bit tired. If earlier films in the franchise were about loss and abandonment and saying goodbye to childhood, this one is ... Read More