Human Exceptionalism

Late Term Eugenic Abortion for Cleft Palate

Pro choicers who advocate for the right to kill viable fetuses based on disability, often claim it is only done in cases of severe abnormality. Baloney. Down syndrome isn’t a “severe” abnormality. Nor is dwarfism, conditions that often lead to late term abortions. Alas, 90% of our brothers and sisters with such conditions aren’t allowed to ever see the light of day.

 But cleft palate?  Apparently so. From the Telegraph story:

Abortion laws should be urgently reviewed amid evidence that pregnancies are being terminated up until full term simply because of cosmetic flaws, according to a committee of MPs and peers. A parliamentary commission has concluded that the rules allowing foetuses to be aborted as late as 40 weeks on grounds of disability are outdated and could amount to “discrimination”.

Parents are being “steered” towards aborting babies with disabilities without proper information on the alternatives available to them, it adds. In extreme cases it has led to foetuses being aborted purely because screening has detected a cleft lip or club foot, conditions which can be dealt with after birth, according to the committee.

“Could” amount to discrimination? Good grief! It’s outright bigotry.

There is now talk of outlawing abortion based on disability in the UK. I’m all for it: But see what happened in Texas with a bill to limit abortion after 20 weeks. Pretty soon, BBC pro choice TV hosts will be wearing tampons for earrings in protest against any limitations on the abortion license.

Things have come to a pretty pass: Our eugenic quest for perfection–and a growing sense of entitlement to have the baby we want–are contributing substantially to collapsing the moral foundation of Western society.

Wesley J. Smith — Wesley J. Smith is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute’s Center on Human Exceptionalism.

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