Human Exceptionalism

Lovelock Loses New Time Warming Religion

Global warming hysteria is part of the war on humans. 

Now, a general in radical environmentalism has hung up his stars. James Lovelock, the founder of Gaia Theory–e.g., earth as a living organism–has become a global warming agnostic. From the Guardian story:

Environmentalism has “become a religion” and does not pay enough attention to facts, according to James Lovelock. The 94 year-old scientist, famous for his Gaia hypothesis that Earth is a self-regulating, single organism, also said that he had been too certain about the rate of global warming in his past book, that “it’s just as silly to be a [climate] denier as it is to be a believer” and that fracking and nuclear power should power the UK, not renewable sources such as wind farms…

Asked if his remarks would give ammunition to climate change sceptics, he said: “It’s just as silly to be a denier as it is to be a believer. You can’t be certain.”

Wisdom. Climate hysterics have lost the public’s ear because their ludicrous, often mutually conflicting predictions, have cost them all credibility.

The best way to be gentle on the earth is to foster greater world prosperity. The environmentalists’ war on humans seeks to do the opposite, promoting policies guaranteed to increase poverty in the developed world and force more than a billion people in the poorest parts of the world to remain mired in bone-crunching destitution.

Radical misanthropic environmentalism serves a fearsome, destructive god.

Wesley J. Smith — Wesley J. Smith is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute’s Center on Human Exceptionalism.

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