Human Exceptionalism

Nevada DA Shrugs at Gun Euthanasia

This is the kind of thing that opens the door to people accepting euthanasia murder as a legitimate action. 

A man shot his wife in the hospital because she was despondent over becoming paralyzed in an accident.

Yet, despite shooting a gun to kill someone in a hospital, the DA has dismissed all charges. From the Reno Gazette-Journal story:

In an interview, Woodbury said his ultimate goal was to achieve a “just result.” “I didn’t view there being any component of evil to his act of killing,” Woodbury said. “We can talk about judgment, and morally whether it was a right or wrong decision, but I didn’t view any aspect of it as evil. That’s truly the component you need to have in a murder case is an evil motive and we didn’t have that.”

A lot of crimes don’t have “evil” intent, but are nonetheless prosecuted. 

Moreover, people despondent over becoming paralyzed often recover their emotional health if given time and proper care.

DA Woodbury lamely says he is not allowing assisted suicide:

Woodbury also said his decision to seek a dismissal should not be interpreted to mean assisted suicide is acceptable. Rather, the facts of this specific case justified the decision, he said.

Baloney. That is precisely what he is doing–whether he intends to or not!

The DA could have filed a different charge based on the killer’s mental state, or accepted a plea bargain to a lesser charge, based on the killer’s age and other factors.

To do nothing about a blatant homicide devalues the lives of paralyzed people and sends a loud message that homicides of the elderly, sick, and disabled to relieve suffering are of less serious societal concern than the killings of other citizens.

But it does show that euthanasia is not really a “medical act” if it is okay for a husband to carry out such a killing with a gun.

Most Popular

Trump: Yes

Editor’s Note: The following is one of three essays, each from a different perspective, in the latest edition of National Review on the question of whether to vote for President Trump. The views below reflect those of the individual author, not of the NR editorial board as a whole. The other two essays can be ... Read More

Trump: Yes

Editor’s Note: The following is one of three essays, each from a different perspective, in the latest edition of National Review on the question of whether to vote for President Trump. The views below reflect those of the individual author, not of the NR editorial board as a whole. The other two essays can be ... Read More
Media

The Hunter Emails

According to a 2015 email, then–vice president Joe Biden met with a top executive at Burisma, the Ukrainian energy firm that paid Biden’s son, Hunter, $50,000 a month to sit on its board. Earlier, the Burisma executive had asked Hunter to use his influence to quell Ukrainian government officials who were ... Read More
Media

The Hunter Emails

According to a 2015 email, then–vice president Joe Biden met with a top executive at Burisma, the Ukrainian energy firm that paid Biden’s son, Hunter, $50,000 a month to sit on its board. Earlier, the Burisma executive had asked Hunter to use his influence to quell Ukrainian government officials who were ... Read More
Elections

How the GOP Can Win Over Millennials

Joel Kotkin, the Presidential Fellow of Urban Futures at Chapman University in Orange, Calif., has written extensively on demographics, housing, and issues related to income inequality in the 21st century. Kotkin often blends research on demographics with historical reasoning, and he has chronicled the decline of ... Read More
Elections

How the GOP Can Win Over Millennials

Joel Kotkin, the Presidential Fellow of Urban Futures at Chapman University in Orange, Calif., has written extensively on demographics, housing, and issues related to income inequality in the 21st century. Kotkin often blends research on demographics with historical reasoning, and he has chronicled the decline of ... Read More