Human Exceptionalism

Suicide Advocates Seek to Influence Institute of Medicine

The euphemistically named Compassion and Choices–spawned out of the old Hemlock Society–is funded in the millions by those who want to make assisted suicide the law of the land. It’s well-paid leaders and staff never miss a bet to push the agenda. 

Here’s an example: An arm of the National Academy of Sciences is collecting stories about end-of-life care. Barbara Coombs Lee, the alpha advocate for C & C, sent out the message to supporters with a non too subtle hint about promoting assisted suicide. From the email:

Your story could help influence important national decisions on end-of-life policy. The non-profit Institute of Medicine, the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences, is conducting a year-long study on death and end-of-life issues. To complement its academic research, the Institute is reaching out to the public for personal stories about end-of-life care…

So this is a wonderful opportunity to influence a critical study that could vastly improve the quality of care — and the scope of choice — people receive at the end of life. It’s also a chance for you and other Compassion & Choices supporters to bring our shared views to senior policy makers. The more we raise our voice about dignity, choice and the scourge of unwanted medical treatment, the better informed medical policy makers will be.

People already have the right to refuse unwanted medical treatment. But the propagandists of C & C continue to pretend dying people are forced to receive aggressive treatment against their will.

Par for the course. As I have written, C & C’s ambition is to become the Planned Parenthood of death, complete with government funding. Part of the tactic is to be visible at the highest official levels about any issue involving dying. This is just a small example. 

Wesley J. Smith — Wesley J. Smith is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute’s Center on Human Exceptionalism.

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