Magazine May 25, 2009, Issue

Four Nights

Sir Simon Rattle (Darren Gygi)
Jay Nordlinger reports from the Salzburg Easter Festival.

Salzburg, Austria

The summer festival that takes place here in this fair city is a very big deal: probably the most prominent music festival in the world. It stretches for five weeks, in July and August, and includes over 100 performances. The Salzburg Easter Festival is a less big deal: but a wonderful deal.

Herbert von Karajan, the late conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic (and other orchestras), founded this festival in 1967. He wanted a showcase for his Berlin band. The resident orchestra during the summer, you see, is a rival orchestra: the rival orchestra: the Vienna Philharmonic. Also, Karajan wanted …

In This Issue

Articles

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Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

Hinge of History

In this important debut book, Michael Kimmage — a young scholar who promises to become one of America’s preeminent intellectual historians — addresses himself to the journeys of two Columbia ...
Politics & Policy

Four Nights

Salzburg, Austria The summer festival that takes place here in this fair city is a very big deal: probably the most prominent music festival in the world. It stretches for ...
Politics & Policy

A Strange Voyage

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Sections

The Bent Pin

The Bent Pin

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The Long View

The Long View

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Politics & Policy

Poetry

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Happy Warrior

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Politics & Policy

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History

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Culture

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Film & TV

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U.S.

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U.S.

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