Magazine June 8, 2009, Issue

Letters

For the Birds

In the picture accompanying Richard Brookhiser’s most recent column (“Bright Wings,” May 25), the bird identified as a phoebe is a phoebe. The bird identified as a crow, however, is not a crow; it’s a raven.

They are different birds, and the difference is not small. The raven has rounded outer tail feathers, a heavier beak, and fine feathers extending over the edge of the beak. Crows have squared-off tails and lighter beaks, cleanly delineated.

The article was very pleasant, and Brookhiser is only beginning to glimpse the intelligence, cooperation, and communication exhibited by corvids. Continuing to observe them would provide him with a lot more material for a lot more columns. I could tell him a lot more, but he will have more fun discovering it for himself.

Kristin K. Freeman

Kuna, Idaho

Putting Specter in His Place

I just happened to be thumbing through the April 20, 2009, issue and came upon the note about Arlen Specter in “The Week”—the one on card check that ended, “It’s nice to see Specter allying with his own party, even temporarily.”

Less than a month later and Arlen’s back where he belongs: driving us nuts.

Brad Bettin

Cocoa, Fla.

The King and I

I have always enjoyed the musings of Jay Nordlinger, and “The Hills Are Alive” (May 4) was his musings at their best. As was true of Jay before this year, I have never attended the Masters, but cannot recall having missed one, in all its detail, on the tube.

It is good to know that Nordlinger has spent too much time playing and studying golf, as have too many of us poor mortals. I was duly impressed with his knowledge of the game. For example, he correctly says: “Gary Player . . . was the best bunker player in the world.”

But I was disappointed that Nordlinger made no reference to Arnold Palmer. It was Arnie, with his play and persona, who really established the Masters’ unequaled prominence. Palmer won the Masters four times (1958, 1960, 1962, and 1964) and narrowly missed a fifth win. He also won the U.S. Open in 1960 and the British Open in 1961 and 1962. The Associated Press named him Athlete of the Decade for the ’60s.

I may be biased, though. I dined last night at Arnie’s Latrobe Country Club (I’ve been a member since 1961) and had a nice chat with him. He is hale and hearty. He wished me a happy 97th birthday.

George J. Heideman

Ligonier, Penn.

Jay Nordlinger replies: I would never forget the King. Wrote about him last summer, in a piece on the reopening of “Golf House,” as we used to know it (“A Day of Golf,” June 30, 2008). Palmer is the guy who made golf so popular, you could barely get a tee time.

Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

In This Issue

Articles

Politics & Policy

Trust the Afghan Army

Along the Durand Line, Northeast Afghanistan — The view from the Karir Pass on the Durand Line separating Afghanistan from Pakistan is spectacular. To the west, a river meanders toward ...
Politics & Policy

The Parent Problem

In late March, the Urban League issued its 2009 “State of Black America” report, which declared that “African Americans remain twice as likely as whites to be unemployed, three times ...

Features

Politics & Policy

Dunce Cap-and-Trade

Democrats in the White House and Congress are now making the most serious push ever for legislation to force reductions of U.S. carbon-dioxide emissions. The stated purpose is to reduce ...

Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

Of Beauty and Loss

Late in 1914 four young Englishmen, just out of school, met and decided it was their mission to reform their country morally, through poetry. The odds of this quixotic enterprise’s ...
Politics & Policy

The Hot Seat

This brisk history of the Supreme Court’s constitutional decisions contains much that is admirable and interesting. Nevertheless, the main lesson advanced by the book has been commonplace at least since ...
Politics & Policy

Shelf Life

The problems of mainline Protestantism in our time — the collapse of what used to be called “the Protestant Establishment” — can make for depressing reading, so it helps that ...
Politics & Policy

Waste Watching

There are very few directors in Hollywood — below the Steven Spielberg league, that is — who can make absolutely any film they want. Consider Ron Howard and Steven Soderbergh, ...
The Straggler

Office Manners

The question going round the dinner table was: Do you have any secret pleasures of a mentionable kind? The subsequent confessions displayed various degrees of weirdness: the lady who sings ...

Sections

Politics & Policy

Letters

For the Birds In the picture accompanying Richard Brookhiser’s most recent column (“Bright Wings,” May 25), the bird identified as a phoebe is a phoebe. The bird identified as a crow, ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ This vice-president, by nature, cannot be in an undisclosed location. ‐ Dick Cheney is the madwoman in the attic, the crazy voice that Republicans ought to stifle. So says the ...
The Long View

Ask Nancy Pelosi

The Speaker of the House responds to your questions. Dear Nancy: I’m a long-time reader, first-time writer. I’ve loved your work in the House of Representatives and have been reading your column ...
Politics & Policy

Postcard From Hubbard Hall

The actresses here fit their parts. Mother, daughter, student, nurse. This play concerns a farm In decline. The barn roof collapses. Chickens die, mysteriously. Gwen plays a concerned daughter. The farmer’s daughter: You know all the jokes. I want to act the traveling salesman, driving, ...
Happy Warrior

Raw Deal

Well, the Speaker has resigned. No, not Nancy Pelosi, but Michael Martin, Speaker of the House of Commons at Westminster. It’s seven-and-a-half centuries since Sir Peter de Montfort served as ...

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Media

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