Magazine June 22, 2009, Issue

How It Was

National Review founder William F. Buckley Jr.
Right Time, Right Place: Coming of Age with William F. Buckley Jr. and the Conservative Movement, by Richard Brookhiser (Basic, 262 pp., $27.50)

Richard Brookhiser in the late 1960s was a clever young student in upstate New York, unconventional only in being somewhat more conservative and more bookish than his peers, when he unexpectedly entered history by mailing to National Review a drily skeptical essay on a student protest at his high school. He lived in a pleasant suburb of Rochester. His parents were respectable, law-abiding, and dutiful middle-class Americans. They demonstrated this most flamboyantly by voting Republican. Rick himself was conscious of belonging to no minority, visible or invisible. He was clever and therefore on the escalator of post-war American meritocracy. Otherwise,

In This Issue

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Books, Arts & Manners

Books

How It Was

A review of Right Time, Right Place: Coming of Age with William F. Buckley Jr. and the Conservative Movement, by Richard Brookhiser.
Books

The Other O’Connor

There was another Catholic novelist named O’Connor at work in the Fifties and Sixties, and for a time he was both better known and vastly more popular.

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