Magazine January 25, 2010, Issue

Letters

U.S. scientist Roger Tsien, speaks at a news conference at the University of California San Diego in La Jolla, Calif., October 8, 2008. (Mike Blake/Reuters )

Fluorescence
I am reminded of one of the supervisors of my Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, Roger Tsien, who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2008. Roger, an American who had done his Ph.D. and research fellowship at Cambridge, had already demonstrated trailblazing genius as a young post-doc by engineering molecules that one could insinuate into a cell to give off fluorescent signals of invisible events inside it. The early versions were imperfect, and there were doubting Thomases in Cambridge, but as an assistant professor at Berkeley he was able to perfect the molecules over the years with two full-time senior

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I am reminded of one of the supervisors of my Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, Roger Tsien, who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2008.

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