Magazine December 31, 2010, Issue

Anti-Anti-Anti

(Ulf Andersen/Getty)

Anthony Burgess, the brilliant British novelist remembered for the misunderstood A Clockwork Orange, also wrote a spy novel. It was the height of the Bond era, and he couldn’t resist satirizing the genre while banging out a crackling yarn at the same time. His publishers no doubt groaned when he presented the title: “Tremor of Intent: An Eschatological Spy Novel.” Yeah, Tony, that’ll sell. There’s a title that tells people to expect underwater lairs stocked with Swedish models in bikinis and poison lipstick. At one point the agent is cornered by an assassin who works for Panleth, an international assassination

In This Issue

Articles

Features

Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

Salt of the Earth

On November 2, the American electorate delivered a stinging rebuke to Pres. Barack Obama and the Democrats. According to a post-election survey conducted for the Faith and Freedom Coalition by ...
Politics & Policy

Teapot Tempest

If you wanted a vivid sense of the scene in 1980s Pakistan and Afghanistan when the United States was sponsoring the mujahideen insurgency against the USSR, you could not have ...

Sections

Athwart

Anti-Anti-Anti

Anthony Burgess, the brilliant British novelist remembered for the misunderstood A Clockwork Orange, also wrote a spy novel. It was the height of the Bond era, and he couldn’t resist ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ “I had a good time governing,” said Bill Clinton at the presidential press conference he took over. You don’t say . . . ‐ President Obama has not taken the ...

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