Magazine December 31, 2010, Issue

Letters

View of the nearby barred-spiral galaxy NGC 1672 taken by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys in August 2005. (NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Collaboration/Handout via Reuters)

Concerning the First-Cause Argument

Edward Feser writes in his review of Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow’s The Grand Design (“Mad Scientists,” November 29):

Like the village atheist whose knowledge of theology derives from what he saw last Sunday on The Jimmy Swaggart Telecast, [Hawking and Mladinow] assume that when philosophers have argued for God as cause of the world, what they mean is that the universe had a beginning, that God caused that beginning, and that to rebut their position it suffices to ask “What caused God?”

On the contrary, speaking of the possible origins of the universe, the authors say: “In this [first-cause]

Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

In This Issue

Articles

Features

Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

Salt of the Earth

On November 2, the American electorate delivered a stinging rebuke to Pres. Barack Obama and the Democrats. According to a post-election survey conducted for the Faith and Freedom Coalition by ...
Politics & Policy

Teapot Tempest

If you wanted a vivid sense of the scene in 1980s Pakistan and Afghanistan when the United States was sponsoring the mujahideen insurgency against the USSR, you could not have ...

Sections

Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ “I had a good time governing,” said Bill Clinton at the presidential press conference he took over. You don’t say . . . ‐ President Obama has not taken the ...
Athwart

Anti-Anti-Anti

Anthony Burgess, the brilliant British novelist remembered for the misunderstood A Clockwork Orange, also wrote a spy novel. It was the height of the Bond era, and he couldn’t resist ...

Recommended

The Latest