Magazine | June 20, 2011, Issue

Letters

In Memoriam

As a friend of Bill Rusher’s for 45 years, I can say the vignettes by his friends and colleagues (“Remembering Bill Rusher,” May 16) accurately capture Bill, the man and his life. I thought the following denouement might be of interest to your readers:

A man of impeccable judgment, Bill chose to be interred in the Self family plot (where his mother also lies), in a piece of America’s heartland, Independence, Kan. The burial took place on Holy Thursday. Bill called for no fuss in Independence — as he said, no one knew him there (although his column ran in the Independence Reporter until the end). But three of us — 40-year friend Alfred Tong; an 83-year-old great aunt; and I — met him in Independence and accompanied him to the gravesite. I read a few passages from the Anglican book of prayer (Bill was an adult convert) and ended with the little quatrain by the 19th-century poet Coventry Patmore, about which he once wrote, “I like to end my talks [with it], because it is optimistic and true”:

For want of me the world’s course will not fail.

When all its work is done the lie shall rot.

The Truth is great, and shall prevail

When none cares whether it prevail or not.

Nearly equidistant between the two cities he loved — New York and San Francisco — America’s heartland, from whence Bill began his journey as an American patriot, is where Bill Rusher deserves to rest. Given his fastidiousness, I doubt the full import of his decision was lost on him.

Bill was lowered to his grave at high noon in San Francisco–like weather conditions, an American flag fluttering nearby in the breeze. I wept in the morning. The skies wept in the afternoon. As I drove away from Independence the next day, also at noon, the sky was clear blue — in thanks, I dare say, to Bill’s contribution to the world.

Thank you, Bill.

Frank A. Shepherd

Coral Gables, Fla.

Correction

Because of a typographical error in an editorial in our June 6 issue (“The End of Osama”), we incorrectly paraphrased George W. Bush. He vowed that Osama bin Laden would be taken dead or alive.

NR Staff — Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

In This Issue

Articles

Politics & Policy

The Moderate

Richard Quinn, who has been working for Republican presidential candidates in South Carolina since 1980, thinks he has found a winner this time: “I think he’s the best I’ve seen, ...
Politics & Policy

Dangerous Disaffection

It is tempting to dismiss the Republicans’ recent loss in New York’s 26th congressional district. A “tea-party” candidate siphoned off conservative votes, and the Republican did not respond to the ...
Politics & Policy

War of Words

‘The Woman Who Stopped Us from Saying ‘Stewardess,’” read a headline last month. The article was a celebration of Kate Swift, who had passed away. She is credited with rooting ...

Features

Politics & Policy

Is Cain Able?

Herman Cain looked startled when Chris Wallace of Fox News quizzed him about the Middle East. “Where do you stand on the right of return?” asked Wallace on his Sunday-morning ...
Politics & Policy

Ages Apart

St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral in Manhattan is now known for the young-adult Mass, celebrated by Fr. Jonathan Morris, it hosts for a lively twentysomething Catholic community every Sunday at 7 ...

Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

Growing Up

‘There’s a demon inside me,” Stu (Ed Helms) confesses to his best friend, Phil (Bradley Cooper), near the end of the redundant, repellent, and occasionally amusing The Hangover: Part II. ...
The Straggler

A Walk in Caria

It is always fun to gather first impressions of a foreign country. Turkey is, John O’Sullivan had explained to me, “upper-tier Third World.” That seems about right. The Third World–itude ...

Sections

Politics & Policy

Letters

In Memoriam As a friend of Bill Rusher’s for 45 years, I can say the vignettes by his friends and colleagues (“Remembering Bill Rusher,” May 16) accurately capture Bill, the man ...
Athwart

Do the Jefferson

The marble temples of Washington enshrine our civic heroes in great stone cenotaphs, so that we may gaze up at their Olympian brows and connect with the virtues they embody. ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

CEMETERY HERD The cemetery was laid out in the 1850s. The headstones are of the differing styles fashionable over the many years of its operation, with paved pathways meandering their narrow course along the top of the ...
Happy Warrior

Signs

To be honest, I quite liked Obama’s “moat with alligators” crack. And, as it happens, the United States is building a moat on the border. The northern border, that is.       ...

Most Popular

Politics & Policy

Students’ Anti-Gun Views

Are children innocents or are they leaders? Are teenagers fully autonomous decision-makers, or are they lumps of mental clay, still being molded by unfolding brain development? The Left seems to have a particularly hard time deciding these days. Take, for example, the high-school students from Parkland, ... Read More
PC Culture

Kill Chic

We live in a society in which gratuitous violence is the trademark of video games, movies, and popular music. Kill this, shoot that in repugnant detail becomes a race to the visual and spoken bottom. We have gone from Sam Peckinpah’s realistic portrayal of violent death to a gory ritual of metal ripping ... Read More
Elections

Romney Is a Misfit for America

Mitt’s back. The former governor of Massachusetts and occasional native son of Michigan has a new persona: Mr. Utah. He’s going to bring Utah conservatism to the whole Republican party and to the country at large. Wholesome, efficient, industrious, faithful. “Utah has a lot to teach the politicians in ... Read More
Law & the Courts

What the Second Amendment Means Today

The horrifying school massacre in Parkland, Fla., has prompted another national debate about guns. Unfortunately, it seems that these conversations are never terribly constructive — they are too often dominated by screeching extremists on both sides of the aisle and armchair pundits who offer sweeping opinions ... Read More
U.S.

Fire the FBI Chief

American government is supposed to look and sound like George Washington. What it actually looks and sounds like is Henry Hill from Goodfellas: bad suit, hand out, intoning the eternal mantra: “F*** you, pay me.” American government mostly works by interposition, standing between us, the free people at ... Read More
Film & TV

Black Panther’s Circle of Hype

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) first infantilizes its audience, then banalizes it, and, finally, controls it through marketing. This commercial strategy, geared toward adolescents of all ages, resembles the Democratic party’s political manipulation of black Americans, targeting that audience through its ... Read More