Magazine April 16, 2012, Issue

Letters

Missing the Point and Loving It

In response to John J. Miller’s article “Friends of the Lorax” (March 19), I must say enthusiastically that I love The Lorax. Now, I don’t give a flying rip about the Truffula Trees. As someone once asked, what kind of wimpy tree is it that you can take down with a single whack of an axe?

No, I love The Lorax for the Super-Axe-Hacker. This marvelous machine bears a striking resemblance to a road grader. And for a country-raised boy, watching the huge and noisy road grader go by about once a month was a treat. A grader (often in response to an angry call to the county judge) mainly served to raise clouds of dust and spread ten times as many rocks across the road as there were before. On the other hand, it also served as a reminder that governmental incompetence is not reserved solely for the federal level.

Just looking at the machined, functional elegance of the Super-Axe-Hacker made The Lorax far and away my favorite Dr. Seuss book.

Dayton L. Kitchens

Norphlet, Ark.

Viva il Casino

In the recent article “Play to Extinction” (March 19), Kevin D. Williamson caricatures casinos and their patrons with hackneyed stereotypes and disparaging language. Moreover, he dramatically mischaracterizes the gaming industry and completely ignores the substantial economic benefits that casinos confer on surrounding communities.

A study of 2010 economic data that was prepared for my organization found that nearly 350,000 jobs are generated directly by the industry. These are satisfying careers with an average compensation (salary and benefits) of $43,500, and our industry further benefits the economy through the vendors and suppliers we use. Taking all these effects into account, the casino industry supported approximately $125 billion in spending and nearly 820,000 jobs in the U.S. in 2010.

With regard to the negative comments about our patrons, the majority of casino visitors are college-educated. Seventy-two percent of casino visitors in 2010 were under the age of 65. Most people who frequent casinos play responsibly, and many do so using a predetermined, limited budget.

I implore you to give readers all the facts when looking at the impact of casinos.

Frank J. Fahrenkopf Jr.

President and CEO

American Gaming Association

Kevin D. Williamson replies: I suppose Mr. Fahrenkopf has a professional obligation to write adjective-heavy letters of this sort, but the economic ugliness — and plain ugliness — of the industry is obvious to anybody who visits a casino. I do not begrudge the industry its profits — consenting adults, etc. — but I do begrudge it the political favoritism it receives, to say nothing of public money in the case of New Jersey.

Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

In This Issue

Articles

Politics & Policy

Polygamy, Too

Presidential candidate Rick Santorum got jeered for comparing the legalization of same-sex marriage to that of polygamy, but, whether or not the comparison is rationally sound, thoughts of the former’s ...

Features

Politics & Policy

Working-Class Wonk

Youngstown, Ohio — Mitt Romney has left the building and the town-hall meeting has ended, but Rob Portman, Ohio’s rail-thin freshman senator, paces across the factory floor to shake hands ...

Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

Bread and Circuses

The Hunger Games, the expensive adaptation of Suzanne Collins’s young-adult dystopia, has been so cleverly hyped, so successfully marketed, so effectively promoted in all the highways and byways of social ...

Sections

Politics & Policy

Letters

Missing the Point and Loving It In response to John J. Miller’s article “Friends of the Lorax” (March 19), I must say enthusiastically that I love The Lorax. Now, I don’t ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ We knew Obama would go negative in this campaign. We didn’t expect that his first target would be Rutherford B. Hayes. ‐ The fatal encounter of George Zimmerman and Trayvon ...
Athwart

Progressively Profane

The official Obama merchandise store isn’t aimed at the 99 percent, unless they can get enough selling plasma to buy that $74 tank top. You can’t imagine anyone in the ...
The Long View

Memorandum

TO: All CNN staff, DOMESTIC ONLY FROM:  Editorial Policy Committee RE:  New racial classifications as of March 2012 To All Producers, Writers, and On-Air Talent: As you know, the recent events in Florida have ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

LEAR IN FLORIDA Lear had no grandchildren to aggrandize him, fondle him with kisses, no photos kept in a drawer, to convince him he’s alive: time slices, filial fawning, thin as thought. What denouement but ...
Happy Warrior

Exodus

As far as the media were concerned, the murder of Jewish schoolchildren in Toulouse and a black teenager in Florida were the same story — literally: Angry white male opens ...

Most Popular

Culture

Thank You, Kanye West

It was “a plan by the Devil to have our kids committing suicide at an all-time high.” So said Kanye West, who recently declared, via Twitter, that he was running for president, on the “Birthday Party” ticket. It’s about the best explanation I’ve heard for the non-coronavirus that plagues us. There’s ... Read More
Culture

Thank You, Kanye West

It was “a plan by the Devil to have our kids committing suicide at an all-time high.” So said Kanye West, who recently declared, via Twitter, that he was running for president, on the “Birthday Party” ticket. It’s about the best explanation I’ve heard for the non-coronavirus that plagues us. There’s ... Read More
Education

The Case for Reopening Schools

On the menu today: My reader who is the head of research for a top-ten hospital weighs in on how to get kids back into classrooms safely this fall, a blathering Biden comment I missed that could have gotten his Twitter account suspended, and California’s state government tries to implement an ambitious ... Read More
Education

The Case for Reopening Schools

On the menu today: My reader who is the head of research for a top-ten hospital weighs in on how to get kids back into classrooms safely this fall, a blathering Biden comment I missed that could have gotten his Twitter account suspended, and California’s state government tries to implement an ambitious ... Read More
Markets

Panic on ESG Street

The sub-headline in a Financial Times story on the anguished reaction of some asset managers to the Trump administration’s belated (if modest) efforts to protect the threat to pensioners' investment returns represented by “socially responsible” investing (SRI) shows where the paper’s sympathies lie (not ... Read More
Markets

Panic on ESG Street

The sub-headline in a Financial Times story on the anguished reaction of some asset managers to the Trump administration’s belated (if modest) efforts to protect the threat to pensioners' investment returns represented by “socially responsible” investing (SRI) shows where the paper’s sympathies lie (not ... Read More
Culture

The Fragility of the Woke

A TikTok video that recently went viral on social media showed a recent Harvard graduate threatening to stab anyone who said “all lives matter.” In her melodrama, she tried to sound intimidating with her histrionics. She won a huge audience, as she intended. But her video also came to the attention of the ... Read More
Culture

The Fragility of the Woke

A TikTok video that recently went viral on social media showed a recent Harvard graduate threatening to stab anyone who said “all lives matter.” In her melodrama, she tried to sound intimidating with her histrionics. She won a huge audience, as she intended. But her video also came to the attention of the ... Read More

The Devil Wears Prada: CDC Edition

Fade In: The Runway Magazine team is busily trying to arrange things for the next fashion shoot. Miranda Priestly, the imperious and impatient and withering editor in chief, sorts through the various items from the racks of couture garments. The underlings stand by, terrified. Off to the side, Miranda’s ... Read More

The Devil Wears Prada: CDC Edition

Fade In: The Runway Magazine team is busily trying to arrange things for the next fashion shoot. Miranda Priestly, the imperious and impatient and withering editor in chief, sorts through the various items from the racks of couture garments. The underlings stand by, terrified. Off to the side, Miranda’s ... Read More
Science & Tech

The Ideological Corruption of Science

Why don't many people “trust the science” anymore? Perhaps because science, as an institution, has fallen prey to the same ideological infection that has invaded and corrupted many other institutions. But it is too rarely discussed, which is why a Sunday Wall Street Journal column by theoretical physicist ... Read More
Science & Tech

The Ideological Corruption of Science

Why don't many people “trust the science” anymore? Perhaps because science, as an institution, has fallen prey to the same ideological infection that has invaded and corrupted many other institutions. But it is too rarely discussed, which is why a Sunday Wall Street Journal column by theoretical physicist ... Read More
National Review

Saturday Night with Bill Buckley

Our late founder rules tonight (July 11) on C-SPAN2, which marks its Summer Series program by rebroadcasting nearly six straight hours of discussions of select books and one in-depth interview on Bill’s overall body of work. Here’s the lineup (times are Eastern): 8:01 p.m.: A 1993 interview with Brian Lamb ... Read More
National Review

Saturday Night with Bill Buckley

Our late founder rules tonight (July 11) on C-SPAN2, which marks its Summer Series program by rebroadcasting nearly six straight hours of discussions of select books and one in-depth interview on Bill’s overall body of work. Here’s the lineup (times are Eastern): 8:01 p.m.: A 1993 interview with Brian Lamb ... Read More