Magazine March 25, 2013, Issue

Poetry

POSTSCRIPT TO THE AENEID

These are no arms or men the poet sings,

But just some very ordinary things:

The plastic station-wagon seat, the grass

Of May reverberating through the glass;

My brother hooting to himself, my sister

Staring ahead, me picking at a blister

Then looking up to shout: a lamb was caught

In a fence. The car stopped. Children scooted out.

We helped each other through barbed-wire strands –

Shooed off like gnats by our excited hands –

And raced across the falling wave of ground

To where he stood — but, startled at the sound

And wrenching free, he trotted to the side,

Which made us stop and watch him, open-eyed

And empty-headed at the strange good cheer,

The unknown joy of what had happened here.

I am still there this moment, not alone

With UPS, blaspheming on the phone.

Freer than God, I am not what I am,

But the child He sees running toward the Lamb.

Sarah Ruden’s most recent work is a translation of Augustine’s Confessions.

In This Issue

Articles

Politics & Policy

Free the Cops

Opponents of New York City’s proactive style of policing struggle mightily to downplay its most obvious benefit: the largest crime drop on record, concentrated overwhelmingly in minority neighborhoods. Now they ...
Politics & Policy

The Obamacare Long Game

To conservatives nationwide, New Jersey governor Chris Christie went from rock star to pariah in just four months. His slide began when he physically embraced President Obama days before the ...

Features

Politics & Policy

The Next Climate Debate

In his second inaugural address, President Obama promised to “respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations.” ...
Politics & Policy

Sam’s Smear

‘Every contributor to this collection . . . blandly ignores the possibility that there could be any real issue of a rational kind in American politics today which would justify ...

Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

Did the Founders Fail?

Chilton Williamson Jr. has written a historically rich, erudite, and serious critique of what he calls contemporary “democracy” (and what others might label “advanced liberalism”). After Tocqueville is an intellectual-history ...

Sections

Politics & Policy

Letters

The South Side in ’62 Kevin D. Williamson’s recent cover story about Chicago’s South Side (“Gangsterville,” February 25) made me sad and brought back memories. I spent the summer of 1962 working ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ We trust that Hugo Chávez is now at an endless Politburo meeting. ‐ In a press conference on sequestration, President Obama said this about alleged Republican intransigence: “I am not ...
Athwart

Retail Politics

American dry-goods retailing is a miserable business. Imagine this: You’re the new head of a vast retailing empire — say, J. B. Dimey’s. Sales are soft; competitors nip at every ...
The Long View

Warner Bros.

FADE IN: EXT. URBAN DYSTOPIA — NIGHT The camera PANS across broken heaps of metal, smoking ruins of a once-proud civilization. Buildings in ruins, children in rags with dirty faces, the distant ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

POSTSCRIPT TO THE AENEID These are no arms or men the poet sings, But just some very ordinary things: The plastic station-wagon seat, the grass Of May reverberating through the glass; My brother hooting to ...
Happy Warrior

Death to Freedom

For half a decade, ever since the Canadian Islamic Congress attempted to criminalize my writing, I’ve found myself waging a grim campaign for freedom of speech in my native land. ...

Most Popular

Law & the Courts

The March for Life Is a March for Truth

Pro-lifers are marching today, as they do every year, to commemorate a great evil that was done in January 1973 and to express solidarity with its innocent victims. The Supreme Court’s decision in Roe v. Wade eliminated legal protections for unborn children in all 50 states, and did so without any ... Read More
Law & the Courts

The March for Life Is a March for Truth

Pro-lifers are marching today, as they do every year, to commemorate a great evil that was done in January 1973 and to express solidarity with its innocent victims. The Supreme Court’s decision in Roe v. Wade eliminated legal protections for unborn children in all 50 states, and did so without any ... Read More

A Nation of Barbers

It seems almost inevitable that long hair is unwelcome at Barbers Hill High School. There’s a touch of aptronymic poetry in Texas public-school dress-code disputes. When I was in school in the 1980s, at the height of the Satanism panic, the local school-district superintendent circulated a list of ... Read More

A Nation of Barbers

It seems almost inevitable that long hair is unwelcome at Barbers Hill High School. There’s a touch of aptronymic poetry in Texas public-school dress-code disputes. When I was in school in the 1980s, at the height of the Satanism panic, the local school-district superintendent circulated a list of ... Read More
Law & the Courts

Clarence Thomas Speaks

Those who know Justice Clarence Thomas say that any perception of him as dour or phlegmatic couldn't be more off-base. He's a charming, gracious, jovial man, full of bonhomie and easy with a laugh, or so I'm told by people who know him well. On summer breaks he likes to roam around the country in an RV and stay ... Read More
Law & the Courts

Clarence Thomas Speaks

Those who know Justice Clarence Thomas say that any perception of him as dour or phlegmatic couldn't be more off-base. He's a charming, gracious, jovial man, full of bonhomie and easy with a laugh, or so I'm told by people who know him well. On summer breaks he likes to roam around the country in an RV and stay ... Read More
U.S.

Nadler’s Folly

Jerry Nadler must have missed the day in law school where they teach you about persuasion. The House Democrat made a critical error early in the trial of President Trump. He didn’t just say that Republican senators, who voted to begin the proceedings without calling witnesses, were part of a cover-up. He said ... Read More
U.S.

Nadler’s Folly

Jerry Nadler must have missed the day in law school where they teach you about persuasion. The House Democrat made a critical error early in the trial of President Trump. He didn’t just say that Republican senators, who voted to begin the proceedings without calling witnesses, were part of a cover-up. He said ... Read More