Magazine | April 22, 2013, Issue

Letters

Have Some Compassion

I write to express my disappointment at yet another paragraph in The Week devoted to transsexuals (March 25). If I recall correctly, this is the third such news bulletin that National Review has printed in recent months, and each time the Editors have offered an arguably snide and certainly unsympathetic comment on some unfortunate person — or child, in this instance.

I usually enjoy National Review’s sense of humor, and I don’t dispute the Editors’ right to reflect however they wish on whatever subject they choose, but I do find it puzzling that the choice is so frequently the transgendered and that these reflections are unfailingly dismissive and unkind. This is beneath a publication with strong Catholic roots and a deserved reputation for incisive and educated analysis.

Those who struggle with perhaps the most fundamental identity of all, that of gender, should receive our deep sympathy and efforts at understanding. Can we imagine that anyone would consider such an extreme remedy as a sex change unless he or she were experiencing deep pain and a conflict between mind and body that the rest of us cannot even comprehend? We should think seriously and compassionately about a six-year-old such as Coy who is grappling with such a profound problem at such a young age, and Coy’s parents, who are themselves deserving of commendation for appreciating their child’s dilemma, even if they are wrong in not appreciating that of the school.

Jesus cautioned us not to judge others, but rather to do unto them as we would wish done unto us. Most assuredly, I would not wish to receive the cavalier treatment that National Review has offered Coy and Coy’s family. Would the Editors wish their own personal struggles to be publicly visited with such scorn? As a wise pastor once said, “Too often Christians nail others to the cross, rather than going to the cross for them.” That is a thought worth remembering before further comment is made on those we disagree with or do not understand.

Karen Amrhein

Baltimore, Md.

Solving the Everyday Problem

Kevin D. Williamson, in his article “The Everyday Problem” (March 25), completely ignores a major contributor to traffic congestion: one person per car.

Yes, there are commuter lanes on some roads, but they are lightly used. There is no real incentive for people to group together. The only possible solution is to charge cars with only one occupant a toll (additional for toll roads) at entries to major roads.

Henry Mulkiewicz

Monmouth Junction, N.J.

NR Staff — Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

In This Issue

Articles

Features

Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

On the Brink

Ginger and Rosa, an intense little coming-of-age drama from the British director Sally Potter, begins with three births: The mushroom cloud goes up over Hiroshima, ushering in the nuclear age, ...
Country Life

Roots Quest

It was not a tough winter in the country, but it was a lingering one, throwing frosts and squalls right through the equinox and beyond. Snow would fall, thin to ...

Sections

Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ On the basketball court over Easter, Obama shot 2 for 22. Must be the sequester. ‐ While a few state governments enacted new gun-control measures in the wake of the ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

A BAD FIT The grapeshot of his words makes ribbons of Her vitals. When one hits a major vein, Her heart will burst, and finally her love Will recognize its efforts were in vain. He ...
Happy Warrior

Undead Reckoning

I try to resist the siren song of metaphor, luring the polemicist onto the gaudy rocks of glibness and meretriciousness only for his sturdy column to crack and sink 400 ...
Politics & Policy

Letters

Have Some Compassion I write to express my disappointment at yet another paragraph in The Week devoted to transsexuals (March 25). If I recall correctly, this is the third such news ...

Most Popular

U.S.

The Gun-Control Debate Could Break America

Last night, the nation witnessed what looked a lot like an extended version of the famous “two minutes hate” from George Orwell’s novel 1984. During a CNN town hall on gun control, a furious crowd of Americans jeered at two conservatives, Marco Rubio and Dana Loesch, who stood in defense of the Second ... Read More
Religion

Billy Graham: Neither Prophet nor Theologian

Asked in 1972 if he believed in miracles, Billy Graham answered: Yes, Jesus performed some and there are many "miracles around us today, including television and airplanes." Graham was no theologian. Neither was he a prophet. Jesus said "a prophet hath no honor in his own country." Prophets take adversarial ... Read More
Film & TV

Why We Can’t Have Wakanda

SPOILERS AHEAD Black Panther is a really good movie that lives up to the hype in just about every way. Surely someone at Marvel Studios had an early doubt, reading the script and thinking: “Wait, we’re going to have hundreds of African warriors in brightly colored tribal garb, using ancient weapons, ... Read More
Law & the Courts

Obstruction Confusions

In his Lawfare critique of one of my several columns about the purported obstruction case against President Trump, Gabriel Schoenfeld loses me — as I suspect he will lose others — when he says of himself, “I do not think I am Trump-deranged.” Gabe graciously expresses fondness for me, and the feeling is ... Read More