Magazine | August 5, 2013, Issue

Letters

Wind Power’s Spotty Record

Rupert Darwall’s excellent article “Free Markets Mean Cheaper Energy” (June 17) had a minor, but salient, error. He correctly noted that Danish electricity spot prices sometimes go negative because of the imbalance in the supply/demand equation introduced by windmills (or, in Mark Steyn’s parlance, “condor Cuisinarts”), but stated that it could happen in the United States. It happens now! As Illinois continues to shed manufacturing plants, and as those remaining generally operate less than 24 hours per day, peak electrical demand in the early morning hours has dropped dramatically. Illinois also happens to be the fourth-largest wind-generation state, and the spot prices of ComEd (which supplies the northern portion of the state) routinely go negative on windy nights. Proponents of wind power often calculate the payback of their bird blenders using the average price of electricity, ignoring the blenders’ effect of pushing prices down precisely when they’re at maximum output!

Terry Smith

Energy consultant

Northwest Illinois Automation

Lanark, Ill.

Art of War

As an (NRA) card-carrying gun nut and NR subscriber, I was surprised and delighted to read “Remington, U.S.A.” in the July 15 issue. But perhaps author Charles C. W. Cooke should have shared his newfound knowledge of this great company and its history with the illustrator. Even conceding that the rifle pictured above the title was offered as a generic representation, it nonetheless misses the mark badly enough to require correction. For the last hundred or so years of its existence (and leaving aside its recent foray into “AR”-type weapons), Remington has been known for two iconic products: pump-action shotguns and bolt-action rifles. The illustration (ignoring the “Monte Carlo” butt stock, which would never be found on such a firearm) is the equally iconic lever-action product of the Marlin Firearms Company of North Haven, Conn., and since 2007 a subsidiary of Remington with principal operations in Madison, N.C. Indeed, the piece’s unique lever pivot and ejection port identify it as the Model 336, a gun that to shooters virtually defines Marlin and which has never, ever been manufactured by Remington, notwithstanding its corporate parentage. Otherwise a fine and inspiring story.

Thomas M. Sullivan

Lake George, N.Y.

You probably don’t need another letter telling you about the graphics accompanying the excellent article “Remington, U.S.A.,” but please add this one to your stack. The cover graphic is, of course, the iconic Colt model 1911A1, and the story graphic is an artist’s rendition of a Marlin 336, both fine firearms, by the way. Remington does manufacture its own version of the 1911, but it has never produced a lever-action rifle similar to the Marlin 336.

Kenneth Scheel

Green Bay, Wis.

Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

In This Issue

Articles

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Features

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An Arm and a Leg

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The Anti-Che

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Books, Arts & Manners

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Law, Naturally

Natural-law theory provides the principal philosophical justification of traditional sexual morality, opposition to abortion, and other paradigmatically conservative views in ethics. Princeton law professor Robert P. George is the most ...
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The Bard in SoCal

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Sections

Politics & Policy

Letters

Wind Power’s Spotty Record Rupert Darwall’s excellent article “Free Markets Mean Cheaper Energy” (June 17) had a minor, but salient, error. He correctly noted that Danish electricity spot prices sometimes go ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ Mike Bloomberg may want to sit down with Bob Filner and explain what ‘stop and frisk’ means. ‐ According to conventional wisdom, the Gang of Eight immigration bill went from ...
Athwart

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The Long View

Memorandum

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Poetry

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Happy Warrior

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Education

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White House

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White House

MoveOn.GOP?

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