Magazine | December 16, 2013, Issue

Letters

Humane on the Range

Many thanks to National Review and Matthew Scully for his excellent article, “Pro-Life, Pro-Animal” (November 25). Our working cattle ranch produces grass-fed beef and operates humanely in affiliation with Animal Welfare Approved. We work under the assumption that what is good for the animals, from chickens to cows, is good for us as stewards of them. We are rewarded with a pleasant life among animals that experience a minimum of pain and violence and thus exhibit a minimum of fear and conflict. The beef and eggs are excellent; they would not be improved by abusing the creatures that produce them.

A good person has a natural inclination to minimize the suffering of fellow human beings and the animals we call pets. As Mr. Scully points out, it is most natural that this mercy should extend to the creatures that feed us as well as those that serve us.

William H. Heard

Lazy A Ranch

Bellville, Texas

People First

Like Matthew Scully, I am pro-life and pro-animal, but his discussion of the cruelty of meat production avoids a key point. As the U.S. and the world see continuing increases in population, traditional methods of animal husbandry are not sufficient to provide animal protein that is affordable even to low-income families. Modern farming methods are not necessarily driven by greed and indifference to animal suffering, but by high demand. Society accepts these methods, perhaps with reluctance, rather than having meat availability limited to the well-to-do. Until bioengineering can produce animal protein without living animals (perhaps a few decades from now), the choice society faces is between industrial-farming methods and restricting the availability of meat due to high price. This would be a difficult choice, but one where the morality of animal treatment is balanced against the morality of making meat affordable to low-income families.

J. A. Penkrot

Pittsburgh, Pa.

Correction

An item in The Week (November 11) asserted that “in February 1962, Scott Carpenter became the fourth American in space, the second to orbit the earth.” In fact, John Glenn was the pilot and sole crew member of the Friendship 7 craft that February. Carpenter was the back-up pilot, but he piloted the Aurora 7 craft in May 1962.

NR Staff — Members of the National Review editorial and operational teams are included under the umbrella “NR Staff.”

In This Issue

Articles

Politics & Policy

Obama’s Iraq

Obama lied, insurance plans died. Okay, it’s not as catchy as the equivalent Bush-era slogan. The thought — that there are parallels between the signature initiative of the George W. Bush ...
Politics & Policy

Obamacare Excuses

‘If you like your health-care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health-care plan, period. No one will take it away, no matter what.” It surprised no one — at ...
Politics & Policy

Raising Saving

Americans don’t save enough. In 1960, the personal-saving rate — the share of people’s after-tax income that they save — was 11 percent. By 2007, it was under 3 percent. ...

Features

Politics & Policy

Left Behind

Owsley County, Ky. — There are lots of diversions in the Big White Ghetto, the vast moribund matrix of Wonder Bread–hued Appalachian towns and villages stretching from northern Mississippi to ...
Politics & Policy

The Drone Wars

The most important military revolution of our time, the development of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), is well under way. In 2000, our military had 60 UAVs. Today it has at ...
Politics & Policy

Men with Plans

Houston, Texas — ‘Everyone he meets,” says a friend of Brent Johnson’s, “winds up going to prison.” Johnson is a Houston businessman. And he volunteers in a prison. Those he ...

Books, Arts & Manners

Sections

Politics & Policy

Letters

Humane on the Range Many thanks to National Review and Matthew Scully for his excellent article, “Pro-Life, Pro-Animal” (November 25). Our working cattle ranch produces grass-fed beef and operates humanely in ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ We have long questioned the wisdom of nuclear negotiations with a party that has a history of promise-breaking and duplicity. So Harry Reid’s actions come as no surprise. ‐ There ...
Athwart

Puttin’ in the Ritz

When I made my daughter’s lunch for school, I occasionally included the Sacrificial Carrots, or some variant. You put in a veggie to do your part as a good parent ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

AUTUMN Autumn is the reflective season, Its cast of light a major reason; Another, the surcease of photosynthesis That leaves green leaves in a splendid parenthesis Of curtained colors that wondrously Were always there, though we ...
Happy Warrior

Sharia’s Protector

Rohullah Qarizada is one of those Afghans you used to see a lot on American TV in the immediate aftermath of the Taliban’s fall. Trimly bearded, dapper in Western suit ...

Most Popular

Politics & Policy

Broward’s Cowards

It is impossible to imagine circumstances under which Broward County sheriff Scott Israel could attempt to perform his duties with the confidence of the public. He should resign immediately, and if, as he promises, he refuses to go quietly, then he should be shown the door by the people he professes to ... Read More
Culture

Courage: The Greatest of Virtues

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is Jonah Goldberg’s weekly “news”letter, the G-File. Subscribe here to get the G-File delivered to your inbox on Fridays. Dear Reader (Or Listener), As the reporter assigned the job of writing the article about all of Sidney Blumenthal’s friends and supporters told his ... Read More
Immigration

My American Dream

This morning, at 8 a.m., I did something I’ve wanted to do for as long as I can remember: I became an American. I first applied for a visa in early 2011, and since then I have slowly worked my way through the system — first as a visa-holder, then as a permanent resident (green card), and, finally, as a ... Read More
Politics & Policy

CNN’s Shameful Town Hall

CNN recently hosted an anti-gun town hall featuring a number of grieving children and parents from Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., who aimed their ire at the National Rifle Association, politicians peripherally associated with the NRA, and anyone who didn’t say exactly what they wanted to hear. ... Read More
U.S.

The Gun-Control Debate Could Break America

Last night, the nation witnessed what looked a lot like an extended version of the famous “two minutes hate” from George Orwell’s novel 1984. During a CNN town hall on gun control, a furious crowd of Americans jeered at two conservatives, Marco Rubio and Dana Loesch, who stood in defense of the Second ... Read More