Magazine | November 19, 2015, Issue

Thankful at Sixty

If memory serves, I first heard about National Review watching Firing Line in the 1980s. I went down to the local drugstore looking for a copy, and to my chagrin it carried The New Republic, not NR. I had to resort to my high-school library, where they had copies in those old hard vinyl binders. The first issue I remember had a cover story on the Kissinger Commission on Central America (not exactly the most alluring subject matter).

As was the case for so many of our readers (some of them share their stories of their first copy of the magazine in this issue), NR was an education. An earnestly active reader, I underlined what seemed the most important bits. Whenever I didn’t understand something, I took it as a challenge, not an affront. I used NR as a bibliography for a conservative education, finding my way to Henry Hazlitt, C. S. Lewis, Whittaker Chambers, and others through its pages.

I kept each issue as if it were a collectible and steadily built my pile of NRs. We occasionally get calls from subscribers who have done the same thing and ask whether we have some use for the years’ worth of issues they have accumulated. (In case you are wondering: If they are from before 2000, yes, we do.)

For me, and for so many of you, NR is more than a magazine. It is a cause and a community. With this issue, we mark 60 years of our joint enterprise, undertaken with you,

our readers.

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programming — this issue has no Week, no columns, and no book reviews — to mark the occasion with dozens of interesting and brilliant people writing about our civilization and our politics, as well as their own intellectual development.

If there is a sense of being embattled to much of it, that’s to be expected. Our situation isn’t as dire as it was in the Cold War, when we were facing down nuclear-armed totalitarianism, but it is dire in different ways. Liberty, the rule of law, and high cultural standards aren’t inevitable or even natural, at least to judge by the experience of most of human history, and will always be under threat from enemies foreign and domestic.

Our defense of them should be high-spirited — always clear-eyed, but never depressive. Bill Buckley liked to say that to despair is a sin.

One of his most important themes was gratitude. This is as good a time as any for me to express some of my own: Thank-you to all of you for reading, and — to many of you — for contributing above and beyond the price of a subscription to keep us afloat; thank-you to all of our editors and other staff, who make it possible to put the magazine to bed fortnightly and publish constantly online; thank-you to our publisher, Jack Fowler, who has the heart of an angel and the accent of a cop from Bronx Precinct 52, and who has poured himself into NR for 25 years now; and thank-you to our writers — they have ensured that my education via the pages of NR has never ended.

When Bill Buckley was still with us, I made a point of occasionally dropping him a note thanking him for the privilege of editing his baby. You will sometimes hear sports enthusiasts say that when they get into sports as a profession — say, a baseball fan joins a team’s front office — the game loses some of its charm. But I have never entirely lost the sense of wonder at this little magazine that I felt when I first discovered it decades ago.

– Rich Lowry

Rich Lowry is the editor of National Review. He can be reached via email: comments.lowry@nationalreview.com. 

In This Issue

Features

Politics & Policy

The Apology Policy

President Barack Obama strutted into the Oval Office utterly convinced of his moral rectitude. Unlike his predecessors, Obama would make policy based on an exquisitely calibrated conscience, sensitivity to constitutional ...
Politics & Policy

Climate Coercion

Predicting catastrophe is a lucrative business. By doing so, the big environmental groups, such as Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth, the World Wildlife Fund, and the Sierra Club, have grown ...
Politics & Policy

The Twitter Trap

Stop me if you’ve heard this story: A die-hard progressive living in a liberal enclave (usually when this story is told, it’s about the late New Yorker film critic Pauline ...

Books, Arts & Manners

Sections

Politics & Policy

Onward

Sixty years ago, WFB said of this brand-new journal that it “stands athwart history, yelling Stop” — in the spirit not of a bearded zealot carrying a hand-lettered sign, but ...

Most Popular

Elections

A Reckoning Is in Store for Democrats

The crisis of the Democrats is becoming more evident each week. Those of us who have been loudly predicting for years that the Russian-collusion argument would be exposed as a defamatory farce, and that the authors of it would eventually pay for it, are bemused at the fallback position of the Trump-haters: that ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Ilhan Omar: A Hostage Situation

‘It has to stop,” says Representative Ilhan Omar. No, it does not. Representative Omar, the Jew-hating Minnesota Democrat, is engaged in one of her usual games of misdirection, a pattern of hers that by now is familiar enough to be predicted: She says something outrageously stupid, offensive, ... Read More
Elections

Why ‘Stop Sanders’?

'Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?” T. S. Eliot asked. “Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?” And where is the intelligence we have lost in cleverness? Cleverness is the plague of our political classes, an influenza of the intellect. The consultants are always trying to ... Read More
Immigration

Trump Is Hell-Bent on ‘Owning the Libs’

President Trump is looking into giving a free trip to San Francisco, New Orleans, or other great American cities to tens of thousands of refugees from Central America. All so he can own the libs. “Owning the libs” is one of those phrases to have emerged over the past few years that vacillates between ... Read More