Magazine September 26, 2016, Issue

Poetry

A MEMORY OF FRANKLIN STREET

Heaven surrounded us, all sweetness then,

Bright sky and earth, so calm and more than fair;

Warm and expansive, welcoming, so when

We passed a building it seemed more than square

Brick and rough timber. I might stop to stare

And wonder at the glow of what had been

Before my time; reach out to touch the bare

And rugged trunk of one great tree again.

Recall my father once stood with me there

As he explained its decades, more than ten,

Of leafing and then shedding. Past repair,

Its life had paralleled the lives of men.

Not his, of course. I see him smiling now

Through all the …

In This Issue

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Letters

The Wage-Floor Roof of the Working-Class Ghetto Helen Andrews’ review of Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir, by J. D. Vance, in the August 15 issue summarizes Vance’s effort to explain the factors ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ Whoever used that hammer on Hillary’s phones should loan it to Huma Abedin. ‐ Acting as if it were an arm of the Clinton campaign, the FBI dumped the contents ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

A MEMORY OF FRANKLIN STREET Heaven surrounded us, all sweetness then, Bright sky and earth, so calm and more than fair; Warm and expansive, welcoming, so when We passed a building it seemed more ...

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