Magazine October 24, 2016, Issue

Letters

Tangents to Heinlein

Interesting that two huge themes with no apparent connection appeared in the October 10 issue: John Fonte & John Yoo’s “Progressivism Goes Global,” and Charles C. W. Cooke’s “The Next Space Age.”

My personal favorite writer from adolescence linked these themes in several of his works, including the first novel I read from his long list that covered several decades: Robert A. Heinlein’s Between Planets (1951). An oppressive world government was thwarted by more traditionally American-minded colonizers on the nearby planets.

Heinlein predicted that free enterprise would eventually become important in space exploration. His best-known novel, Stranger in a Strange

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Tangents to Heinlein Interesting that two huge themes with no apparent connection appeared in the October 10 issue: John Fonte & John Yoo’s “Progressivism Goes Global,” and Charles C. W. Cooke’s ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ Gary Johnson may not know where Aleppo is, but he always knows where the Doritos are. ‐ Lester Holt is a registered Republican, but he clearly doesn’t let his partisan ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

DAWN WIND The day comes with a dawn wind brisk enough to ripple the broad waters circling back beneath the waterfall, where the sheet of ice at the edge of those circling waters, the chunks of ...

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