Magazine December 19, 2016, Issue

Letters

American Interests and Obligations

Mr. Nordlinger raises a legitimate question as to the extent to which Americans should be prepared to commit military resources, i.e., American lives, in furtherance of our treaty obligations (“Smaller Countries, Far Away,” October 24). Pursuant to realpolitik theory, the only time a state should commit its forces into any armed conflict is when its national interest is directly affected. That is the reason the Kremlin blinked during the Cuban missile crisis and why they never intervened directly during the Nicaraguan civil war on behalf of the Sandinistas. The Kremlin recognized correctly that these states were/are part

NR Editors includes members of the editorial staff of the National Review magazine and website.

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American Interests and Obligations Mr. Nordlinger raises a legitimate question as to the extent to which Americans should be prepared to commit military resources, i.e., American lives, in furtherance of our ...
Politics & Policy

The Week

‐ Say what you will about Twitter, it’s an improvement over Josh Earnest. ‐ President-elect Donald Trump has appointed Alabama senator Jeff Sessions to be the next attorney general. Sessions is ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

MOVING Worn chairs with no seats cluster where A mirror gives back a dull stare At memories of other times. As leather books are losing rhymes, They tumble from a cardboard box Where fossils hide, within ...

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