Magazine | May 29, 2017, Issue

Letters

Girl with Bull

I read Jay Nordlinger’s piece about Fearless Girl (“Girl, Misplaced,” May 1) and her placement opposite Charging Bull and agree that it’s an injustice that the new sculpture warps the meaning of another’s work.

I love the vision of both statues but don’t understand why they have to be in opposition to each other. Isn’t the idea of the “can-do spirit of America” the same as the fearless spirit of a “woman hold[ing] her ground, no matter what challenges come barreling down the pike”? I have an idea for resolving the dispute. Instead of having her oppose the bull, place Fearless Girl in front and to the side of Charging Bull and let them face the challenges America encounters together, fearless and with a can-do spirit.

Mary Turner

Via e-mail

Clarifying the Law

Ramesh Ponnuru announces, with approval it seems, that “a relatively solid conservative bloc of four . . . will be capable of making law when Justice Anthony Kennedy joins it” (“The Gorsuch Triumph,” May 1).

And that is a good thing? I thought conservatives prided themselves in recognizing that making laws is reserved for the people’s representatives in Congress, and not for the members of SCOTUS, however conservative they may be.

John Vandonk

Norco, Calif.

Ramesh Ponnuru responds: I meant “making law” as in “specifying legal rules based on statutes and the Constitution,” not “replacing the content of statutes and the Constitution.” The phrasing is ambiguous, I’ll admit, but in my defense I was not making an argument about jurisprudence.

What about the Fair Tax?

Mr. Cole’s excellent article “The Case for Tax Reform” (May 1) is both timely and pertinent; however, he missed an opportunity by not considering replacing the graduated income tax. Funding the federal government through a national sales tax, a.k.a. “Fair Tax,” is an idea much praised but seldom seriously discussed. Although replacing the current method of funding the federal government is closer to revolution than reform and unlikely in the short term, the benefits are obvious and well documented. Such a consideration was understandably beyond the scope of this article, but possibly Mr. Cole could be persuaded to write an article considering revolution?

Dave Helma

Mica, Wash.

Alan Cole responds: Many of the reforms discussed in the piece include elements of the Fair Tax proposal. For example, removing deductions and adopting a destination-based business tax are both reforms that make the current tax code more like the Fair Tax. However, adopting a Fair Tax system in full would increase taxes on many lower-income voters. This is likely why Congress so far seems reluctant to do so.

NR Editors — NR Editors includes members of the editorial staff of the National Review magazine and website.

In This Issue

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Letters

Letters

Girl with Bull I read Jay Nordlinger’s piece about Fearless Girl (“Girl, Misplaced,” May 1) and her placement opposite Charging Bull and agree that it’s an injustice that the new sculpture ...
The Week

The Week

‐ We were for firing Comey before the Democrats were against it. ‐ President Trump fired FBI director James Comey, who had made himself eminently fireable. Last July, Comey took it ...
Poetry

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