Magazine | May 29, 2017, Issue

Letters

Girl with Bull

I read Jay Nordlinger’s piece about Fearless Girl (“Girl, Misplaced,” May 1) and her placement opposite Charging Bull and agree that it’s an injustice that the new sculpture warps the meaning of another’s work.

I love the vision of both statues but don’t understand why they have to be in opposition to each other. Isn’t the idea of the “can-do spirit of America” the same as the fearless spirit of a “woman hold[ing] her ground, no matter what challenges come barreling down the pike”? I have an idea for resolving the dispute. Instead of having her oppose the bull, place Fearless Girl in front and to the side of Charging Bull and let them face the challenges America encounters together, fearless and with a can-do spirit.

Mary Turner

Via e-mail

Clarifying the Law

Ramesh Ponnuru announces, with approval it seems, that “a relatively solid conservative bloc of four . . . will be capable of making law when Justice Anthony Kennedy joins it” (“The Gorsuch Triumph,” May 1).

And that is a good thing? I thought conservatives prided themselves in recognizing that making laws is reserved for the people’s representatives in Congress, and not for the members of SCOTUS, however conservative they may be.

John Vandonk

Norco, Calif.

Ramesh Ponnuru responds: I meant “making law” as in “specifying legal rules based on statutes and the Constitution,” not “replacing the content of statutes and the Constitution.” The phrasing is ambiguous, I’ll admit, but in my defense I was not making an argument about jurisprudence.

What about the Fair Tax?

Mr. Cole’s excellent article “The Case for Tax Reform” (May 1) is both timely and pertinent; however, he missed an opportunity by not considering replacing the graduated income tax. Funding the federal government through a national sales tax, a.k.a. “Fair Tax,” is an idea much praised but seldom seriously discussed. Although replacing the current method of funding the federal government is closer to revolution than reform and unlikely in the short term, the benefits are obvious and well documented. Such a consideration was understandably beyond the scope of this article, but possibly Mr. Cole could be persuaded to write an article considering revolution?

Dave Helma

Mica, Wash.

Alan Cole responds: Many of the reforms discussed in the piece include elements of the Fair Tax proposal. For example, removing deductions and adopting a destination-based business tax are both reforms that make the current tax code more like the Fair Tax. However, adopting a Fair Tax system in full would increase taxes on many lower-income voters. This is likely why Congress so far seems reluctant to do so.

In This Issue

Articles

Features

Books, Arts & Manners

Sections

Letters

Letters

Girl with Bull I read Jay Nordlinger’s piece about Fearless Girl (“Girl, Misplaced,” May 1) and her placement opposite Charging Bull and agree that it’s an injustice that the new sculpture ...
The Week

The Week

‐ We were for firing Comey before the Democrats were against it. ‐ President Trump fired FBI director James Comey, who had made himself eminently fireable. Last July, Comey took it ...
Poetry

Poetry

MOONLIGHT IN NASHUA The moonlight rouses me at half past three, piercing through thick curtains I had drawn, but for this gap. My heavy-lidded eyes return the glare. What’s this bald rock to me but ...

Most Popular

Law & the Courts

Obstruction Confusions

In his Lawfare critique of one of my several columns about the purported obstruction case against President Trump, Gabriel Schoenfeld loses me — as I suspect he will lose others — when he says of himself, “I do not think I am Trump-deranged.” Gabe graciously expresses fondness for me, and the feeling is ... Read More
Politics & Policy

Students’ Anti-Gun Views

Are children innocents or are they leaders? Are teenagers fully autonomous decision-makers, or are they lumps of mental clay, still being molded by unfolding brain development? The Left seems to have a particularly hard time deciding these days. Take, for example, the high-school students from Parkland, ... Read More
PC Culture

Kill Chic

We live in a society in which gratuitous violence is the trademark of video games, movies, and popular music. Kill this, shoot that in repugnant detail becomes a race to the visual and spoken bottom. We have gone from Sam Peckinpah’s realistic portrayal of violent death to a gory ritual of metal ripping ... Read More
Elections

Romney Is a Misfit for America

Mitt’s back. The former governor of Massachusetts and occasional native son of Michigan has a new persona: Mr. Utah. He’s going to bring Utah conservatism to the whole Republican party and to the country at large. Wholesome, efficient, industrious, faithful. “Utah has a lot to teach the politicians in ... Read More
Law & the Courts

What the Second Amendment Means Today

The horrifying school massacre in Parkland, Fla., has prompted another national debate about guns. Unfortunately, it seems that these conversations are never terribly constructive — they are too often dominated by screeching extremists on both sides of the aisle and armchair pundits who offer sweeping opinions ... Read More
U.S.

Fire the FBI Chief

American government is supposed to look and sound like George Washington. What it actually looks and sounds like is Henry Hill from Goodfellas: bad suit, hand out, intoning the eternal mantra: “F*** you, pay me.” American government mostly works by interposition, standing between us, the free people at ... Read More
Film & TV

Black Panther’s Circle of Hype

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) first infantilizes its audience, then banalizes it, and, finally, controls it through marketing. This commercial strategy, geared toward adolescents of all ages, resembles the Democratic party’s political manipulation of black Americans, targeting that audience through its ... Read More