Magazine August 14, 2017, Issue

The Radical

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Henry David Thoreau: A Life, by Laura Dassow Walls (Chicago, 640 pp., $35)

‘Jefferson’s public career focused on securing for Americans,” the eminent historian Edmund S. Morgan wrote, “a right of expatriation from the past.” Morgan argued that this was a large part of “the meaning of independence” for Jefferson. The more populist and charismatic democrat Andrew Jackson was a proponent, wrote Richard Hofstadter, of “self-assertive subjectivism.” Jefferson and Jackson both defeated and replaced Adamses of a more conservative, traditional cast of mind, men who were their moral superiors. However hypocritically and self-interestedly, Jefferson and Jackson offered more radical, flattering definitions of the independence of both self and nation, a development whose literary-philosophical

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M. D. Aeschliman (Ph.D., Columbia) has written for National Review since 1984 and has taught at universities in the United States, Switzerland, and Italy. His father, Adrien R. Aeschliman, saw frontline combat against the Japanese in 1944–45 in New Guinea and the Philippines in the 32nd Infantry Division, one of the most battle-hardened divisions of the U.S. Army in any theater of operations in World War II.

In This Issue

Articles

Features

Books, Arts & Manners

Politics & Policy

The Radical

Long after Henry David Thoreau’s death in 1862, Walt Whitman praised him for his “lawlessness — his dissent — his going his own absolute road let hell blaze all it chooses.”

Sections

The Week

The Week

‐ George Romero, 1940 –2017. Rest in peace — please. ‐ The New York Times has revealed that, in June 2016, Donald Trump Jr. got an e-mail from Rob Goldstone, a ...
Politics & Policy

Poetry

THE CUSP OF SUMMER Geese in skies are on the wing. The pointed flock, triangle-shaped, Announce with honks the start of spring When tall green trees are softly draped. Trumpeting starts off everything Once more. Black ...
Letters

Letters

A Bleak Future for Wage Growth Robert VerBruggen’s “conundrum” about wage-growth stalling (“A Wage-Growth Conundrum,” July 31) clears up when you realize that the categories of capital, labor, and productivity as ...

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The Dossier Deceit

The Dossier Deceit

John Durham’s latest indictment reinforces that the Russian collusion conspiracy was built on a preposterous foundation.

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