Magazine | July 9, 2018, Issue

Letters

President Trump walks with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during their summit meeting in Singapore, June 12, 2018. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

A Summit Lost in Vapor

In the Week in the June 25 issue, writing about the approaching Trump–Kim summit, you predicted: “The North will use some sort of promise of denuclearization to relax the international pressure against it. Even if Trump doesn’t want to ease up, it will be hard to resist South Korean entreaties to loosen the sanctions regime based on positive atmospherics around the historic meeting. And the Chinese will exploit any cracks in the sanctions.”

Check, check, and check. I would call National Review clairvoyant, except that this was about as difficult as predicting that the Democrats will overreact to every immigration reform.

Gerald Pierson
Long Beach, Calif.

 

Witness to China’s Oppression

Fang Zheng, profiled by Jay Nordlinger in “Standing Tall for China” (June 25), gave me reason to believe that the battle against the Chinese Communist Party’s practice of suppressing information that threatens its survival isn’t completely lost. It seems one of the most powerful weapons is personal stories.

Fang Zheng has committed his life to using his personal story to open the eyes of the world to what happened in Tiananmen Square on June 4, and I believe that he and his fellow survivors have been successful. Today, the West has largely recognized the massacre and the Chinese government’s role in it. Perhaps we ought to listen to personal narratives about China’s other crimes, too.

Patrick Ellis
Detroit, Mich.

 

Extraordinary Pedestrian

I certainly offer my condolences to all who cherished Michael Potemra. But I must say that I was very happy to read in Rich Lowry’s obituary (June 11) that Mr. Potemra had the habit of reading while walking. I’m not as crazy as my wife thinks I am.

Albert Alioto
San Francisco, Calif.

NR Editors — NR Editors includes members of the editorial staff of the National Review magazine and website.

In This Issue

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Readers respond on the Trump-Kim summit, a Chinese political activist, and our friend Mike Potemra.

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