Magazine February 25, 2019, Issue

Letters

Members of the Great Lakes anti-fascist organization (Antifa) fly flags during a protest against the alt-right outside a hotel in Warren, Mich., March 4, 2018. (Stephanie Keith/Reuters)

‘We Go Where They Go’

Kevin D. Williamson’s “Whose Streets Indeed?” (December 31, 2018) notes that anti-fascist activity has the potential to be authoritarian itself, a perception buoyed by the chaos of street action featuring much that may be only tangentially related to “crushing the fash.”

It is often assumed that Antifa is naïve to this insight. Yet most earnest Antifa members focus on research and education, not spectacle. If anyone is likely to have more than cursory knowledge of the totalitarian school of fascist scholarship while still confronting the Richard Spencer followers and Aleksandr Duginists of the world, it is they.

Something to Consider

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In This Issue

Articles

Features

Books, Arts & Manners

Books

Law and Disorder

Amy L. Wax reviews Misdemeanorland: Criminal Courts and Social Control in an Age of Broken Windows Policing, by Issa Kohler-Hausmann.

Sections

Letters

Letters

Readers write in to address Kevin D. WIlliamson’s essay on Antifa and Douglas Murray’s recent comments on hate crimes.
The Week

The Week

Everyone watched on television, but it was a defensive, low-scoring affair. The Super Bowl was kind of boring, too.

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