Magazine | May 6, 2019, Issue

For Russell Kirk

Russell Kirk in front of his home in Mecosta, Mich., November 1984 (AP Photo/Jay McNally)

The panting ideologues locked in their rooms
Hear the word ‘order’ and cry out in fear
That it is just a shibboleth for dooms
As yet unseen but whose goosesteps they hear.

But, it is better thought of as the word
A bachelor mulls as he writes through the night
And which enables him, some thought occurred,
To set it down in prose both broad and tight.

While others lapse upon their couch in dreams,
Or type with bloodshot eyes and whiskey breath,
The ordered man appears as his work seems
Fixed with a permanence to outlast death.

Cathedral glass has color and firm border,
As do such men formed in the love of order.

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Elections

How States Like Virginia Go Blue

So this is what it feels like to live in a lab experiment. As a native Virginian, I’ve watched my state come full circle. The last time Democrats enjoyed the amount of power in the Old Dominion that they won on Tuesday, I was entering middle school in Fairfax County. In 1993 the governor was a Democrat, one ... Read More
Books, Arts & Manners

Why Study Latin?

Oxford professor Nicola Gardini urges people to read and study Latin. He believes that Latin is the antidote for the modern age, which seems transfixed by the spontaneous, the easy, and the ephemeral. His new book, Long Live Latin: The Pleasures of a Useless Language, argues that Latin combines truth and ... Read More
Elections

Democratic Denial

One point I'd draw out from David Harsanyi's post below: It has been more than thirty years since a Democratic presidential nominee failed to make it to the White House and thought the loss was legitimate. Read More
Elections

Religious-Freedom Voters Will Vote Trump

The late Supreme Court Justice Frank Murphy wrote, "Freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and freedom of religion all have a double aspect — freedom of thought and freedom of action.” To which one should be able to add, freedom of inaction -- meaning that absent a compelling state interest, people should ... Read More