Magazine October 5, 2020, Issue

The Mystery of Robert E. Lee

Robert E. Lee (Bettmann/Contributor/Getty Images)
He prized self-control above all, but did not always achieve it

No one who ever met Robert Edward Lee — whatever the circumstances of the meeting — failed to be impressed by the man. From his earliest days as a cadet at West Point, through 25 years as an officer in the U.S. Army’s Corps of Engineers and six more as a senior cavalry officer, and then as the supreme commander of the armies of the Confederacy, Lee’s dignity, his manners, his composure, all seemed to create a peculiar sense of awe in the minds of observers. In the midst of the battle of Fredericksburg in December 1862, Lee astonished Francis

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Allen C. Guelzo — Mr. Guelzo is the Senior Research Scholar in the Council of the Humanities at Princeton University.

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The Week

The Week

When Speaker Nancy Pelosi was photographed in a San Francisco hair salon, in violation of local lockdown rules, her defense was . . . interesting.

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