Magazine November 2, 2020, Issue

Remember Books—Reading On-Screen Is Not the Same

(Peter Nicholls/Reuters)

I used to read. Most of my fare was paperbacks. I developed, as all confirmed readers did, tastes and taboos peculiar to myself. Crack­ing the spine of a book seemed destructive to me, so the front and back covers had to be curled back as I read. I also made musical accompaniment by tapping the spine with my fingertips. In college, when it became necessary to take notes, I underlined, by preference with a ballpoint pen. A friend of mine, another reader from youth, considers this monstrous, but he turns down the corners of relevant pages, which I find

This article appears as “Remember Books” in the November 2, 2020, print edition of National Review.

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In This Issue

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The Week

The Week

At an event in Miami, Biden asserted that if Judge Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court, “she may very well move to overrule Roe.”

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