Magazine November 16, 2020, Issue

Future of Christian Marriage: Mark Regnerus in New Book Studies It & Advises

A wedding ceremony in the Nagorno-Karabakh region, currently the site of military conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan, October 24, 2020 (David Ghahramanyan/NKR InfoCenter/PAN via Reuters )
The Future of Christian Marriage, by Mark Regnerus (Oxford, 280 pp., $29.95)

Justyna is a Christian. She be­lieves in Christian marriage, even insisting, in company with the Church, that the matrimonial bond is unbreakable except by death. Justyna is engaged to be married, in her native Poland. But she has been living with her boyfriend for the past two years, while they save up the money for a large wedding. She resents her priest’s warning that this is sinful and unwise. She believes in marriage, but she would rather accept cohabitation than give up her dreams of a beautiful wedding.

Clearly, Justyna is conflicted. And she’s not alone. Young Christians all over the

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This article appears as “Marriages of True Minds” in the November 16, 2020, print edition of National Review.

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