Magazine November 16, 2020, Issue

When the Dream of Russian Democracy Died

Russian president Vladimir Putin at a meeting in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, December 25, 2019 (Alexander Nemenov/Reuters)
Never Speak to Strangers and Other Writings from Russia and the Soviet Union, by David Satter (ibidem Press, 692 pp., $69)

If asked to name the moment when hopes for post-Soviet Russian democracy died, the typical West­ern observer will usually point to something that occurred under Vladimir Putin’s tenure. He might single out the 2003 arrest and imprisonment of anti-Putin oil-and-gas magnate Mikhail Khodorkovsky on trumped-up charges, a punishment meant as a warning to the rest of Russia’s oligarch class not to get involved in opposition politics. Or he might point to one of the many government raids on or seizures of var­ious independent media outlets during Putin’s first term as president. He might even choose the strange series of apartment

This article appears as “Reading Russia’s Tragic Spirit” in the November 16, 2020, print edition of National Review.

Something to Consider

If you enjoyed this article, we have a proposition for you: Join NRPLUS. Members get all of our content (including the magazine), no paywalls or content meters, an advertising-minimal experience, and unique access to our writers and editors (conference calls, social-media groups, etc.). And importantly, NRPLUS members help keep NR going. Consider it?

If you enjoyed this article, and were stimulated by its contents, we have a proposition for you: Join NRPLUS.

LEARN MORE
Nat Brown is a former deputy web editor of Foreign Affairs and a former deputy managing editor of National Review Online.

In This Issue

Articles

Features

Books, Arts & Manners

Sections

The Week

The Week

Biden said he would appoint a bipartisan commission to study Court-packing and other changes to the courts.

Most Popular

Film & TV

Bowing Down to Obama

‘How can we miss you when you won’t go away?” political podcaster Yvette Carnell joked two years ago when Barack Obama began his comeback tour by making sideline pronouncements about the state of the nation after his brief retirement. Now the comeback is official, with two new Kool-Aid-drinker Obama ... Read More
Film & TV

Bowing Down to Obama

‘How can we miss you when you won’t go away?” political podcaster Yvette Carnell joked two years ago when Barack Obama began his comeback tour by making sideline pronouncements about the state of the nation after his brief retirement. Now the comeback is official, with two new Kool-Aid-drinker Obama ... Read More
Economy & Business

Shopping Superstitions

It’s the boss-bossiest time of the year, when Americans getting ready to open up their wallets to buy Christmas presents are lectured by illiterate halfwits about where and how to spend their money. The usual demands: Buy local, or buy from small businesses. This is pure nonsense, and you should feel free to ... Read More
Economy & Business

Shopping Superstitions

It’s the boss-bossiest time of the year, when Americans getting ready to open up their wallets to buy Christmas presents are lectured by illiterate halfwits about where and how to spend their money. The usual demands: Buy local, or buy from small businesses. This is pure nonsense, and you should feel free to ... Read More
Media

Wajahat Ali, Ctd.

I gather he didn’t like my comment on his New York Times op-ed on the folly of reaching out to Trump supporters. He snipes, “I await The National Review’s piece on reaching out to Biden voters and reading about their ‘elegy’ and understanding their ‘economic anxiety.’” After the 2016 election, ... Read More
Media

Wajahat Ali, Ctd.

I gather he didn’t like my comment on his New York Times op-ed on the folly of reaching out to Trump supporters. He snipes, “I await The National Review’s piece on reaching out to Biden voters and reading about their ‘elegy’ and understanding their ‘economic anxiety.’” After the 2016 election, ... Read More
World

A Moveable Feast?

Last week a unique but apposite tribute was paid in Budapest to the late Sir Roger Scruton, the distinguished Tory philosopher who died earlier this year: A café was opened in his name. It goes under the designer label “Scruton—The Place to be” and is situated three blocks from the Hungarian Parliament at ... Read More
World

A Moveable Feast?

Last week a unique but apposite tribute was paid in Budapest to the late Sir Roger Scruton, the distinguished Tory philosopher who died earlier this year: A café was opened in his name. It goes under the designer label “Scruton—The Place to be” and is situated three blocks from the Hungarian Parliament at ... Read More