Magazine November 16, 2020, Issue

‘To America’

A brass ensemble plays at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y., on October 23. (Steven Pisano)
Feeling alive in a cemetery

Brooklyn, N.Y.

‘Green-Wood is an active cemetery,” reads a sign outside the entrance, and I can’t help smiling. I know what they mean — people are working, being buried, etc. — but still . . .

You enter through fantastic arches, designed by Richard Upjohn during the Civil War. This could be the façade of the Munsters’ house, I think. At any rate, the arches make a perfect entrance for a grand cemetery, especially as night falls, as it is doing now.

I’ve come for a concert, and a highly unusual one.

Green-Wood Cemetery, here in Brooklyn, was founded in 1838. In addition to

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The Week

Biden said he would appoint a bipartisan commission to study Court-packing and other changes to the courts.

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